Voice meaning

vois
(linguistics) Expiration of air through vibrating vocal cords, used in the production of vowels and voiced consonants.
noun
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To voice is defined as to express through words.

An example of to voice is stating concerns about something.

verb
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A sound resembling or reminiscent of vocal utterance.

The murmuring voice of the forest.

noun
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The definition of a voice is a sound made by the mouth.

An example of a voice is someone who sings beautifully.

An example of a voice is someone reading out loud to a child.

noun
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(grammar) A property of verbs or a set of verb inflections indicating the relation between the subject and the action expressed by the verb.

“Birds build nests” uses the active voice; “nests built by birds” uses the passive voice.

noun
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To give expression to; utter.

Voice a grievance.

verb
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(linguistics) To pronounce with vibration of the vocal cords.
verb
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Sound made through the mouth, esp. by human beings in talking, singing, etc.
noun
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The ability to make sounds orally or to speak, sing, etc.

To lose one's voice.

noun
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The characteristic speech sounds normally made by a particular person.

To recognize someone's voice over the phone.

noun
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Utterance or expression.

Giving voice to his joy.

noun
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(phonet.) Sound made by vibration of the vocal cords with air forced from the lungs, as in the articulation of all vowels and such consonants as (b), (d), (g), and (m)
noun
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To give utterance or expression to; utter or express in words.
verb
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(phonetics) Sound of the kind or quality heard in speech or song in the consonants b, v, d, etc., and in the vowels; sonant, or intonated, utterance; tone; "” distinguished from mere breath sound as heard in f, sg, sh, etc., and also whisper.
noun
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A specified quality, condition, or pitch of vocal sound.

A hoarse voice; the announcer's booming voice.

noun
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The distinctive style or manner of expression of an author or of a character in a book.
noun
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To provide the voice for (a cartoon character or show, for example).

The animated series was voiced by famous actors.

verb
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A specified condition, quality, or tone of vocal sound.

An angry voice.

noun
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The person or other agency by which something is expressed or made known.

A newspaper known to be the voice of the administration.

noun
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(phonet.) To utter with voice.
verb
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The sound made by air passing out through the larynx and upper respiratory tract and produced by the vibration of the vocal organs.
noun
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The ability to produce such sounds.
noun
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Sounds made through the mouth by humans while talking, singing, or otherwise audibly communicating through the use of vocal organs. Although human voice frequencies mostly fall in the range of 100
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Sound uttered by the mouth, especially that uttered by human beings in speech or song; steven; sound thus uttered considered as possessing some special quality or character; as, the human voice; a pleasant voice; a low voice.

He with a manly voice saith his message. "” Geoffrey Chaucer.

Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low; an excellent thing in woman. "” Shakespeare, King Lear, V-iii.

Thy voice is music. "” Shakespeare, Henry V, V-ii.

Join thy voice unto the angel choir. "” John Milton.

noun
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The tone or sound emitted by anything.

After the fire a still small voice. "” 1 Kings 19:12

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? "” Job 40:9

The floods have lifted up their voice. "” Psalms 93:3

O Marcus, I am warm'd; my heart Leaps at the trumpet's voice. "” Joseph Addison.

noun
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The faculty or power of utterance; as, to cultivate the voice.
noun
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Language; words; speech; expression; signification of feeling or opinion.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice; for I stand in doubt of you. "” Galatians 4:20

My voice is in my sword. "” Shakespeare, Macbeth, V-vii.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church. "” Bp. Fell.

noun
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Opinion or choice expressed; judgment; a vote.

Sicinius. How now, my masters! have you chose this man? / 1st Citizen. He has our voices, sir. "” Shakespeare, Coriolanus, II-iii.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice / Of holy senates, and elect by voice. "” John Dryden.

noun
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Command; precept; "” now chiefly used in scriptural language.

So shall ye perish; because ye would not be obedient unto the voice of the Lord your God. "” Deuteronomy 8:20

noun
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One who speaks; a speaker.

A potent voice of Parliament. "” Alfred Tennyson.

noun
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(grammar) A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.
noun
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(Internet, IRC) A flag associated with a user on a channel, determining whether or not they can send messages to the channel.
noun
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To give utterance or expression to; to utter; to publish; to announce; to divulge; as, to voice the sentiments of the nation.

Rather assume thy right in silence and . . . then voice it with claims and challenges. "” Francis Bacon.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. "” Francis Bacon.

verb
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(phonology) To utter with sonant or vocal tone; to pronounce with a narrowed glottis and rapid vibrations of the vocal cords; to speak above a whisper.
verb
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To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.
verb
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(Internet) To assign the voice flag to a user on IRC, permitting them to send messages to the channel.
verb
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(television, film) To act as a voice actor to portray a character.
verb
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at the top of (one's) voice
  • As loudly as one's voice will allow.
idiom
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with one voice
  • In complete agreement; unanimously.
idiom
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in voice
  • with the voice in good condition, as for singing
idiom
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with one voice
  • unanimously
idiom
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Origin of voice

  • Middle English from Old French vois from Latin vōx vōc- wekw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English vois, from Anglo-Norman voiz, voys, voice, Old French vois, voiz (Modern French voix), from Latin vōcem, accusative form of Latin vōx (“voice"), from Proto-Indo-European *wek-, *wekÊ·-, *wokÊ·- (“to utter, speak"). Cognate with Sanskrit वच् (“to say, speak"), German erwähnen (“to mention"). Displaced native Middle English steven (“voice"), from Old English stefn (see steven), Middle English rouste (“voice") from Old Norse raust, and Middle English rearde (“voice") from Old English reord. Compare advocate, advowson, avouch, convoke, epic, vocal, vouch, vowel.

    From Wiktionary