Vent meaning

vĕnt
Vent is something that lets air in and out.

An example of vent is the part of your air conditioning system where the cool air blows out.

noun
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Forceful expression or release of pent-up thoughts or feelings.

Give vent to one's anger.

noun
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To vent is to complain about something you are annoyed or angry about in order to relieve some of your anger.

An example of vent is when you call your friend and whine to her about how your husband never unloads the dishwasher.

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An opening permitting the escape of fumes, a liquid, a gas, or steam.
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(zoology) The excretory opening of the digestive tract in animals such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.
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To express (one's thoughts or feelings, for example), especially forcefully.
verb
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To release or discharge (steam, for example) through an opening.
verb
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To provide with a vent.
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To vent one's feelings or opinions.

Sorry to go on like that, but I just had to vent.

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To be released or discharged through an opening.
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To rise to the surface of water to breathe. Used of a marine mammal.
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A slit in a garment, as in the back seam of a jacket.
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(rare) The action of escaping or passing out, or the means or opportunity to do this; issue; outlet.
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Expression; release.

Giving vent to emotion.

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In early guns, the small hole at the breech through which a spark passes to set off the charge.
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The opening in a volcano from which gas and molten rock erupt.
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(zool.) The excretory opening in animals; esp., the external opening of the cloaca in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.
noun
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To make a vent in or provide a vent for.
verb
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To allow (steam, gas, etc.) to escape through an opening.
verb
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To give release or expression to (thoughts or feelings)
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To relieve or unburden (oneself) by giving vent to feelings.
verb
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To give release or expression to one's thoughts or feelings.
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A vertical slit in a garment, esp. one put in the back or sides of a coat.
noun
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To make a vent or vents in.
verb
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An opening permitting the escape of fumes, a liquid, a gas, or steam.
noun
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(zoology) The excretory opening of the digestive tract in animals such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.
noun
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To release or discharge something such as steam through an opening.
verb
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To provide with a vent.
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An opening, and the conduit leading to it, in the side or at the top of a volcano, permitting the escape of fumes, a liquid, a gas, or steam.
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An opening through which gases, especially air, can pass.

The vent of a cask; the vent of a mould.

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A small aperture.
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The opening of a volcano from which lava flows.
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The excretory opening of lower orders of vertebrates.
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A slit in the seam of a garment.
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The opening at the breech of a firearm, through which fire is communicated to the powder of the charge; touchhole.
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In steam boilers, a sectional area of the passage for gases divided by the length of the same passage in feet.
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Opportunity of escape or passage from confinement or privacy; outlet.
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Emission; escape; passage to notice or expression; publication; utterance.
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(intransitive) To allow gases to escape.

The stove vents to the outside.

verb
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To allow to escape through a vent.

Exhaust is vented to the outside.

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(intransitive) To express a strong emotion.

He vents his anger violently.

Can we talk? I need to vent.

verb
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To snuff; to breathe or puff out; to snort.

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To sell; to vend.
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(obsolete) A baiting place; an inn.
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The small hole at the breech of a gun through which the charge is ignited.
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Origin of vent

  • Partly from French vent (from Old French) and partly alteration of French évent (from Old French esvent) (from esventer to let out air) (from Vulgar Latin exventāre) (Latin ex- ex–) (Latin ventus wind wē- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English vente alteration (probably influenced by Old French vent wind) of fente from Old French slit from fendre to split open from Latin findere fission

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Partly from French vent, from Latin ventus and party from French éventer.

    From Wiktionary

  • Spanish venta (“a poor inn, sale, market"). See vent (“sale").

    From Wiktionary

  • French vente, from Latin vendere (“to sell").

    From Wiktionary

  • Clipping of ventriloquism

    From Wiktionary