Spiracle meaning

spĭrə-kəl, spīrə-
(zoology) A respiratory aperture, especially:
  • Any of several tracheal openings in the exoskeleton of an insect, spider, or other terrestrial arthropod.
  • A small respiratory opening behind the eye of most sharks and rays and certain other fishes.
  • The blowhole of a cetacean.
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(zoology) A respiratory aperture, especially:
  • Any of several tracheal openings in the exoskeleton of an insect, spider, or other terrestrial arthropod.
  • A small respiratory opening behind the eye of most sharks and rays and certain other fishes.
  • The blowhole of a cetacean.
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(zool.) An aperture for breathing, as.
  • Any of the small external openings of the tracheal respiratory system in most terrestrial arthropods, ordinarily along the sides of certain thoracic and abdominal segments; stigma.
  • Any of various similar openings for the passage of air or respiratory water, as in tadpoles.
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An aperture or opening through which air is admitted and expelled.
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An opening through which certain animals breathe, such as the blowhole of a whale or one of the openings in the exoskeleton of an insect.
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A pore or opening used (especially by spiders and some fish) for breathing.
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The blowhole of a whale.
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Any small aperture or vent for air or other fluid.
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An aperture or opening through which air is admitted and expelled.
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A small opening allowing the outer air to come through into a confined space; air hole.
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(geol.) A small vent formed on the surface of a thick lava flow.
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Origin of spiracle

  • Middle English from Latin spīrāculum from spīrāre to breathe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin spiraculum, from spirare (“to breathe").

    From Wiktionary