Froth meaning

frôth, frŏth
Froth is defined as to make foam.

An example of froth is using a steam wand to make foam on the top of milk.

verb
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The definition of froth is foam or foaming bubbles.

An example of froth is the bubbles at the top of a poured beer.

noun
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A mass of bubbles in or on a liquid; foam.
noun
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Salivary foam released as a result of disease or exhaustion.
noun
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Something unsubstantial or trivial.
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High prices unwarranted by economic fundamentals.

A housing market with a lot of froth.

noun
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A fit of anger or vexation.

Was in a froth over the long delay.

noun
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To cover with foam.
verb
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To cause to foam.
verb
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To exude or expel foam.

A dog frothing at the mouth.

verb
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A whitish mass of bubbles; foam.
noun
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Foaming saliva caused by disease or great excitement.
noun
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Light, trifling, or worthless talk, ideas, etc.
noun
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To cause to foam.
verb
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To cover with foam.
verb
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To spill forth like foam.
verb
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To produce froth; foam.
verb
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A mass of bubbles in or on a liquid; foam.
noun
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Salivary foam released as a result of disease or exhaustion.
noun
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To cover with foam.
verb
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To cause to foam.
verb
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To exude or expel foam.

A dog frothing at the mouth.

verb
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Froth is a very important feature of many types of coffee.

noun
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(figuratively) Unimportant events or actions; drivel.

Thousands of African children die each day: why do the newspapers continue to discuss unnecessary showbiz froth?

noun
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To create froth in.

I like to froth my coffee for ten seconds exactly.

verb
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(intransitive) To bubble.

The chemical frothed up when I added the acid.

verb
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To spit, vent, or eject, as froth.
verb
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To cover with froth.

A horse froths his chain.

verb
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Origin of froth

  • Middle English from Old Norse frodha

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Noun attested around 1300, from Old Norse froða, from Proto-Germanic *fruþōn; Old English afreoðan (“to froth”) is from same Germanic root. Verb attested from late 14th century.

    From Wiktionary