Yeast meaning

yēst
Any of various single-celled fungi in which little or no mycelium develops and which ordinarily reproduce by budding: they ferment sugars to form alcohol and carbon dioxide.
  • Any of various yeasts (esp. genus Saccharomyces) used in food production, as in making beer, wine, etc. and as a leavening in baking.
  • Any of various yeasts (esp. genus Candida) causing infections or diseases.
noun
1
0
To froth or ferment.
verb
1
0
An agent of ferment or activity.

Political agitators who are the yeast of revolution.

noun
1
1
Froth consisting of yeast cells together with the carbon dioxide they produce in the process of fermentation, present in or added to fruit juices and other substances in the production of alcoholic beverages.
noun
0
0
A powdered or compressed commercial preparation of yeast cells, used chiefly as a leavening agent or as a dietary supplement.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
Foam; froth.
noun
0
0
Froth consisting of yeast cells together with the carbon dioxide they produce in the process of fermentation, present in or added to fruit juices and other substances in the production of alcoholic beverages.
noun
0
0
A powdered or compressed commercial preparation of yeast cells, used chiefly as a leavening agent or as a dietary supplement.
noun
0
0
Any of various one-celled fungi that reproduce by budding and can cause the fermentation of carbohydrates, producing carbon dioxide and ethanol. There are some 600 known species of yeast, though they do not form a natural phylogenic group. Most yeasts are ascomycetes, but there are also yeast species among the basidiomycetes and zygomycetes. The budding processes in yeasts show a wide range of variations. In many yeasts, for example, the buds break away as diploid cells. Other yeasts reproduce asexually only after meiosis, and their haploid buds act as gametes that can combine to form a diploid cell, which functions as an ascus and undergoes meiosis to produce haploid spores. Still other yeasts form buds in both haploid and diploid phases. The ascomycete yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in baking to produce the carbon dioxide that leavens dough and batter. It has been the subject of extensive research in cell biology, and its genome was the first to be sequenced among eukaryotes. A variety of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are used in making beer and wine to provide alcohol content and flavor. Certain other yeasts, such as Candida albicans , are pathogenic in humans.
0
0
Advertisement
An often humid, yellowish froth produced by fermenting malt worts, and used to brew beer, leaven bread, and also used in certain medicines.
noun
0
0
A single-celled fungus of a wide variety of taxonomic families.
  • A true yeast or budding yeast in order Saccharomycetales.
  • Candida, a ubiquitous fungus that can cause various kinds of infections in humans.
noun
0
0
(figuratively) A frothy foam.
noun
0
0
verb
0
0
(of something prepared with a yeasted dough) To rise.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(African American Vernacular, slang) To exaggerate.
verb
0
0

Origin of yeast

  • Middle English yeest from Old English gist yes- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English Ä¡iest, from Proto-Germanic *jestuz. Compare Dutch gist, Swedish jäst.

    From Wiktionary