Ferment definition

fûrmĕnt
To cause to undergo fermentation.
verb
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To undergo fermentation.
verb
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Something, such as a yeast, bacterium, mold, or enzyme, that causes fermentation.
noun
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To produce by or as if by fermentation.
verb
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To make turbulent; excite or agitate.
verb
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To be in an excited or agitated state; seethe.
verb
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A substance or organism causing fermentation, as yeast, bacteria, enzymes, etc.
noun
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The definition of ferment is to excite, or to have a chemical breakdown of a substance using bacteria, yeast or enzymes.

When you cause a protesting crowd to get even madder then they already are, this is an example of when you ferment.

When you use yeast to make bread dough rise, this is an example of when you ferment.

verb
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Ferment is defined as agitation and excitement.

When a group of protesters gradually becomes more and more angry about their cause, this is an example of ferment.

noun
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A state of agitation or of turbulent change or development.
noun
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An agent that precipitates or is capable of precipitating such a state; a catalyst.
noun
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noun
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A state of excitement or agitation.
noun
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To cause fermentation in.
verb
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To excite; agitate.
verb
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To be in the process of fermentation.
verb
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To be excited or agitated; seethe.
verb
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An agent, such as an enzyme, bacterium, or fungus, that brings about fermentation.
noun
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Fermentation.
noun
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To undergo or cause to undergo fermentation.

Cabbage that has fermented; yeasts that ferment sugars.

verb
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To react, using fermentation; especially to produce alcohol by aging or by allowing yeast to act on sugars; to brew.
verb
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To stir up, agitate, cause unrest or excitement in.
verb
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Something, such as a yeast or barm, that causes fermentation.
noun
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A state of agitation or of turbulent change.
noun
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A gentle internal motion of the constituent parts of a fluid; fermentation.
noun
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noun
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Fermentation.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ferment
Plural:
ferments

Origin of ferment

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin fermentum bhreu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French ferment, from Latin fermentare (“to leaven, ferment”), from fermentum (“substance causing fermentation”), from fervere (“to boil, seethe”). See also fervent.

    From Wiktionary