Foam meaning

fōm
The definition of foam is a thick frothy lather of bubbles.

An example of foam is the white bubbles at the top of a freshly poured glass of beer.

An example of foam is foamy saliva produced by physical exertion.

noun
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A colloidal dispersion of a gas in a liquid or solid medium, such as shaving cream, foam rubber, or a substance used to fight fires. A foam may be produced, especially on the surface of a liquid, by agitation or by a chemical reaction, such as fermentation.
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Any of various light, porous, semirigid or spongy materials, usually the solidified form of a liquid full of gas bubbles, used as a building material or for thermal insulation or shock absorption, as in packaging.
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The sea.
noun
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To produce or issue as foam; froth.
verb
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To teem; seethe.

A playground foaming with third graders.

verb
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To cause to produce foam.
verb
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To cause to become foam.
verb
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The whitish mass of bubbles formed on or in liquids by agitation, fermentation, etc.
noun
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Something like foam, as the heavy sweat of horses, or frothy saliva.
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The sea.
noun
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A kind of colloid in which a gas is suspended in a liquid or solid matter, having a texture ranging from soft and liquid, as whipped cream, to firm and elastic, as foam rubber.
noun
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To form, produce, or gather foam; froth.
verb
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To cause to foam.
verb
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To produce or issue as foam; froth.
verb
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Small, frothy bubbles formed in or on the surface of a liquid, as from fermentation or shaking.
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A colloid in which particles of a gas are dispersed throughout a liquid.
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A substance composed of a large collection of bubbles or their solidified remains.

He doesn't like so much foam in his beer.

A foam mat can soften a hard seat.

noun
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(by extension) Sea foam; (figuratively) the sea.

He is in Europe, across the foam.

noun
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To form or emit foam.
verb
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foam at the mouth
  • To be very angry; rage.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of foam

  • Middle English fom from Old English fām
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English fom, from Old English fām (“foam”), from Proto-Germanic *faimaz (“foam”), from Proto-Indo-European *poyǝmn-, *spoyǝmn- (“foam”). Cognate with German Feim (“foam”), Latin spūma (“foam”), Latin pūmex (“pumice”), Kurdish (“epilepsy”).
    From Wiktionary