Scud meaning

skŭd
(nautical) To run before a gale with little or no sail set.
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The act of scudding.
noun
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To run or skim along swiftly and easily.

Dark clouds scudding by.

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The act of scudding.
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To run or move swiftly; glide or skim along easily.
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To be driven or run before the wind.
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The act of scudding.
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Spray, rain, or snow driven by the wind.
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A sudden gust of wind.
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(meteorol.) Very low, dark, patchy clouds moving swiftly, generally characteristic of bad weather.
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(slang, Scotland) Naked.
adjective
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(intransitive) To race along swiftly (especially used of clouds).
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(intransitive, nautical) To run, or be driven, before a high wind with no sails set.
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(Northumbrian) To hit.
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(Northumbrian) To speed.
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(Northumbrian) To skim.
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Clouds or rain driven by the wind.
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A gust of wind.
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(Bristolian) A scab on a wound.
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A small flight of larks, or other birds, less than a flock.
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Any swimming amphipod crustacean.
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(slang, Scotland) Pornography.
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(slang, Scotland) Irn-Bru.

A bottle of Scud.

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A Soviet-developed ballistic missile.
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Origin of scud

  • Possibly from Middle English scut rabbit, rabbit's tail scut1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The term comes from the NATO reporting name SS-1 Scud which was attached to the missile by Western intelligence agencies.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps from Old Norse skjóta (“to throw, to shoot").

    From Wiktionary