Neck definition

nĕk
To kiss and caress amorously.
verb
2
1
A relatively narrow elongation, projection, or connecting part.

A neck of land; the neck of a flask.

noun
0
0
(music) The narrow part along which the strings of an instrument extend to the pegs.
noun
0
0
(geology) Solidified lava filling the vent of an extinct volcano.
noun
0
0
The siphon of a bivalve mollusk, such as a clam.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A narrow margin.

Won by a neck.

noun
0
0
The part of the body joining the head to the shoulders or trunk.
noun
0
0
A narrow or constricted area of a bodily structure, as of a bone, that joins its parts; a cervix.
noun
0
0
The part of a tooth between the crown and root.
noun
0
0
To strangle or decapitate (a fowl).
verb
0
0
Advertisement
That part of a human or animal joining the head to the body, including the part of the backbone between the skull and the shoulders.
noun
0
0
That part of a garment which covers, encircles, or is nearest the neck.
noun
0
0
The narrowest part of any object, considered to be like a neck.
  • A narrow strip of land.
  • The narrowest part of an organ.
    The neck of the uterus, the neck of a tooth.
  • The narrowest or tapering part of a bottle, vase, etc.
  • A strait or channel.
noun
0
0
(geol.) A vertical column of hardened igneous rock, formerly plugging a volcanic conduit and later exposed by erosion and weathering.
noun
0
0
(slang) To engage in amorous kissing, hugging, and caressing.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The part of the body joining the head to the shoulders or trunk.
noun
0
0
A narrow or constricted part of a structure, as of a bone or an organ, that joins its parts; a cervix.
noun
0
0
The part of a tooth between the crown and the root.
noun
0
0
The part of body connecting the head and the trunk found in humans and some animals.
noun
0
0
The corresponding part in some other anatomical contexts.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The part of a shirt, dress etc., which fits a person's neck.
noun
0
0
The tapered part of a bottle toward the opening.
noun
0
0
(botany) The slender tubelike extension atop an archegonium, through which the sperm swim to reach the egg.
noun
0
0
(music) The extension of any stringed instrument on which a fingerboard is mounted.
noun
0
0
A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(engineering) A reduction in size near the end of an object, formed by a groove around it.

A neck forming the journal of a shaft.

noun
0
0
To hang by the neck; strangle; kill, eliminate.
verb
0
0
(US) To make love; to snog; to intently kiss or cuddle.

Alan and Betty were necking in the back of a car when Betty's dad caught them.

verb
0
0
To drink rapidly.
verb
0
0
To decrease in diameter.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The part of a garment around or near the neck.
noun
0
1
A narrow part between the head, or end, and the body, or base, of any object.

The neck of a violin, the neck of a goblet.

noun
0
1
neck and neck
  • So close that the lead between competitors is virtually indeterminable.
idiom
0
0
up to (one's) neck
  • Deeply involved or occupied fully:
    I'm up to my neck in paperwork.
idiom
0
0
break one's neck
  • to try very hard
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
get it in the neck
  • to be severely reprimanded or punished
idiom
0
0
neck and crop
  • completely; entirely
idiom
0
0
neck and neck
  • even or nearly even during the course of a race or competition
    The candidates are neck and neck in the polls.
idiom
0
0
neck of the woods
  • a region or locality
    Not from this neck of the woods.
idiom
0
0
risk one's neck
  • to put one's life, career, reputation, etc. in danger
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
stick one's neck out
  • to expose oneself to possible failure, ridicule, loss, etc. by taking a chance
idiom
0
0
win (or lose) by a neck
  • to win (or lose) by the length of a horse's head and neck
  • to win (or lose) any contest by a narrow margin
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
neck
Plural:
necks

Origin of neck

  • Middle English nekke from Old English hnecca

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English nekke, nakke, from Old English hnecca, *hnæcca (“neck, nape"), from Proto-Germanic *hnakkô (“nape, neck"), from Proto-Indo-European *knog-, *kneg- (“back of the head, nape, neck"). Cognate with Scots nek (“neck"), North Frisian neek, neeke, Nak (“neck"), Saterland Frisian Näcke (“neck"), West Frisian nekke (“neck"), Dutch nek (“neck"), Low German Nakke (“neck"), German Nacken (“nape of the neck"), Danish nakke (“neck"), Swedish nacke (“neck"), Icelandic hnakki (“neck"), Tocharian A kñuk (“neck, nape"). Possibly a mutated variant of *kneug/k (cf. Old English hnocc 'hook, penis', Welsh cnwch 'joint, knob', Latvian knaÅ«Ä·is 'dwarf', Ancient Greek knychóō 'to draw together'). More at nook.

    From Wiktionary