Cape definition

kāp
Frequency:
A piece of land projecting into a body of water; promontory; headland.
noun
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To maneuver (the bull) by means of a cape in a bullfight.
verb
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A brightly colored cloth used in maneuvering the bull in a bullfight; a capote or muleta.
noun
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A point or head of land projecting into a body of water.
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A point or head of land projecting into a body of water.
noun
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The definition of a cape is piece of land that sticks into the water.

An example of a cape is the piece of land just north of Nantucket Sound in Massachusetts.

noun
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A cape is defined as a piece of clothing without any sleeves that's worn over the shoulders and attaches at the front of the neck.

An example of a cape is what Superman wears to help him fly.

noun
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(geography) A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into a sea or lake; a promontory; a headland.
noun
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A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders, but not reaching below the hips.
noun
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(nautical) To head or point; to keep a course.

The ship capes southwest by south.

verb
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To skin an animal, particularly a deer.
verb
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For names of actual capes, see the specific element of the names; for example, Hatteras, Cape; Good Hope, Cape of. Other geographic names beginning with Cape are entered under Cape; for example, Cape Town, South Africa; Cape York Peninsula.
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A sleeveless outer garment hanging over the back and shoulders and often fastening at the neck.
noun
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A sleeveless outer garment fastened at the throat and worn hanging over the shoulders.
noun
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the Cape
  • Cape of Good Hope
  • Cape of Good Hope Province
  • Cape Cod
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
cape
Plural:
capes

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Cape

Origin of cape

  • Middle English cape partly variant of cope cope cope2 and partly from Anglo-Norman cape (from Medieval Latin cāpa) (variant of Late Latin cappa)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English cap from Old French from Old Provençal from Latin caput head kaput- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle French cap, from Latin caput (“head”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English capa, from Late Latin cappa (“cape”).

    From Wiktionary