Stole meaning

stōl
An ornamental garment worn over both shoulders and tapering to a point in front and in back, worn especially by members of church choirs.
noun
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A long scarf, usually of embroidered silk or linen, worn over the left shoulder by deacons and over both shoulders by priests and bishops while officiating.
noun
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2
A scarf-like garment, often made of fur.
noun
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(botany) A stolon.
noun
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A woman's long scarf of cloth or fur worn about the shoulders.
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Simple past tense of steal.
verb
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noun
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A long robe or outer garment worn by matrons in ancient Rome.
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A long, robelike outer garment worn by matrons in ancient Rome.
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A long, decorated strip of cloth worn around the neck or over one shoulder by officiating clergy of various churches.
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A woman's long scarf of cloth or fur worn around the shoulders.
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verb
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Origin of stole

  • Middle English from Old English from Latin stola garment, robe from Greek stolē stel- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old English stole, Latin stola, Ancient Greek στολή (stolÄ“, “stole, garment, equipment"), from "to set", "place", "equip", "send", akin to English stall.
    From Wiktionary
  • Latin stolo, -onis.
    From Wiktionary
  • From the verb to steal.
    From Wiktionary