Bottle definition

bŏtl
To put into a bottle or bottles.
verb
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To store (a gas, a liquefied gas, etc.) under pressure in a tank or cylinder.
verb
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Milk from an infant's nursing bottle.
noun
2
1
A receptacle having a narrow neck, usually no handles, and a mouth that can be plugged, corked, or capped.
noun
1
1
The quantity that a bottle holds.
noun
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A receptacle filled with milk or formula that is fed, as to babies, in place of breast milk.
noun
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To place in a bottle.
verb
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1
To hold in; restrain.

Bottled up my emotions.

verb
1
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Alcoholic liquor.
noun
1
1
The definition of a bottle is a container with a neck that holds liquids.

An example of a bottle is a container in which wine is sold.

noun
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Bottle is defined as to put something into a container.

An example of bottle is to fill glass containers with milk.

verb
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Intoxicating liquor.

Don't take to the bottle.

noun
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The practice of drinking large quantities of intoxicating liquor.

Her problem is the bottle.

noun
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The amount that a bottle holds.
noun
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The volume of liquid contained in a standard U.S. wine bottle, 750 ml (25.4 oz)
noun
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(brit., dial.) A bundle, as of hay.
noun
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(UK dialectal) A building; house.
noun
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A container, typically made of glass and having a tapered neck, used for holding liquids.

Beer is often sold in bottles.

noun
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The contents of such a container.

I only drank a bottle of beer.

noun
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A container with a rubber nipple used for giving liquids to infants.

The baby wants a bottle.

noun
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(UK, informal) Nerve, courage.

You don't have the bottle to do that! He was going to ask her out, but he lost his bottle when he saw her.

noun
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(of a person with a particular hair col) With one's hair color produced by dyeing.

Did you know he's a bottle brunette? His natural hair color is strawberry blonde.

noun
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1599, Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare, Act 1 Scene 1

DON PEDRO. Well, if ever thou dost fall from this faith, thou wilt prove a notable argument.

BENEDICK. If I do, hang me in a bottle like a cat and shoot at me; and he that hits me, let him be clapped on the shoulder and called Adam.

noun
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1590s, Doctor Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe.

I was no sooner in the middle of the pond, but my horse vanished away, and I sat upon a bottle of hay, never so near drowning in my life.

noun
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(figuratively) Intoxicating liquor; alcohol.

To drown one's troubles in the bottle.

noun
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To seal (a liquid) into a bottle for later consumption.

This plant bottles vast quantities of spring water every day.

verb
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(UK) To feed (an infant) baby formula.

Because of complications she can't breast feed her baby and so she bottles him.

verb
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(UK, slang) To refrain from doing (something) at the last moment because of a sudden loss of courage.

The rider bottled the big jump.

verb
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(UK, slang) To strike (someone) with a bottle.

He was bottled at a nightclub and had to have facial surgery.

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(UK, slang) To pelt (a musical act on stage, etc.) with bottles as a sign of disapproval.

Meat Loaf was once bottled at Reading Festival.

verb
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A container, esp. for liquids, made of glass, plastic, etc. and having a relatively narrow neck.
noun
2
3
bottle up
  • to shut in, as enemy troops
  • to hold in or suppress, as emotions
idiom
1
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hit the bottle
  • to drink much alcohol
idiom
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
bottle
Plural:
bottles

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bottle

  • Middle English botel from Old French botele from Medieval Latin butticula diminutive of Late Latin buttis cask

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bottle, botle, buttle, from Old English botl, bold (“abode, house, dwelling-place, mansion, hall, castle, temple”), from Proto-Germanic *budlą, *buþlą, *bōþlą (“house, dwelling, farm”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhōw- (“to swell, grow, thrive, be, live, dwell”). Cognate with North Frisian budel, bodel, bol, boel (“dwelling, inheritable property”), Dutch boedel, boel (“inheritance, estate”), Danish bol (“farm”), Icelandic ból (“dwelling, abode, farm, lair”). Related to Old English byldan (“to build, construct”). More at build.

    From Wiktionary

  • Anglo-Norman and Old French boteille (Modern French bouteille), from Vulgar Latin *botticula, ultimately of disputed origin. Probably a diminutive of Late Latin buttis.

    From Wiktionary