Door meaning

dôr
The definition of a door is a movable structure used for opening and closing an entrance or for giving access to something.

An example of a door is what someone would open to get into their house.

noun
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The room or building to which a door belongs.

They live three doors down the hall.

noun
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A means of approach or access.

Looking for the door to success.

noun
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A doorway.
noun
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To strike (a passing bicyclist, for example) by suddenly opening a vehicular door.
verb
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A portal of entry into a building, room or vehicle, consisting of a rigid plane movable on a hinge. Doors are frequently made of wood or metal. May have a handle to help open and close, a latch to hold the door closed, and a lock that ensures the door cannot be opened without the key.

I knocked on the vice president's door.

noun
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To serve as a doorman or doorwoman of (a nightclub, for example).
verb
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A movable structure for opening or closing an entrance, as to a building or room, or giving access to a closet, cupboard, etc.: most doors turn on hinges, slide in grooves, or revolve on an axis.
noun
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The room or building to which a particular door belongs.

Two doors down the hall.

noun
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Any opening with a door in it; doorway.
noun
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noun
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(1) See drive door.
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Any flap, etc. that opens like a door.

The 24 doors in an Advent calendar.

noun
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A non-physical entry into the next world, a particular feeling, a company, etc.

Keep a door on your anger.

noun
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(computing, dated) A software mechanism by which a user can interact with a program running remotely on a bulletin board system. See BBS door.
noun
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(cycling) To cause a collision by opening the door of a vehicle in front of an oncoming cyclist or pedestrian.
verb
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at (someone's) door
  • As a charge holding someone responsible:.
    You shouldn't lay the blame for the fiasco at her door.
idiom
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close
  • To refuse to allow for the possibility of:.
    The secretary of state closed the door on future negotiations.
idiom
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leave the door open
  • To allow for the possibility of:.
    Let's leave the door open for future stylistic changes.
idiom
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show (someone) the door
  • To eject (someone) from the premises.
  • To terminate the employment of; fire.
idiom
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lay at the door of
  • To blame (a person) for.
idiom
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lie at someone's door
  • To be imputable or chargeable to someone.
idiom
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out of doors
  • Outside a house, building, etc.; outdoors.
idiom
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show someone the door
  • To ask or command someone to leave.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

at (someone's) door
leave the door open
lay at the door of
lie at someone's door

Origin of door

  • Middle English dor from Old English duru, dor dhwer- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English dore, dor, from Old English duru (“door”), dor (“gate”), from Proto-Germanic *durz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer-, *dʰwor- (“doorway, door, gate”). Cognates include West Frisian doar, Dutch deur, German Tür (“door”), Tor (“gate”), Danish dør, Icelandic dyr, Latin foris, Modern Greek θύρα (thýra), Albanian derë pl. dyer, Kurdish derge (der), derî, Persian در (dar), Russian дверь (dver’), Hindustani द्वार (dvār) / دوار (dvār), Armenian դուռ (duṙ), Irish doras, Lithuanian durys.
    From Wiktionary