Interpreter meaning

ĭn-tûrprĭ-tər
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The definition of an interpreter is a person or a computer program that translates from one language to another so that people who speak different languages can communicate.

When a person who speaks English and a person who speaks Italian have a meeting and need to communicate with each other, an interpreter is the person who translates from Italian to English and vice versa.

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(computers) A program that executes other programs.
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(figuratively) One who explains something, such as an art exhibit.
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One who translates orally from one language into another.
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One who gives or expounds an interpretation.
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One who listens to a speaker in one language and relates that utterance to the audience in a different language. Contrasted with translator.

A Japanese man who is tried before a German court is assisted by an interpreter in making oral statements.

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(computing) A program which executes another program written in a programming language other than machine code.

Programs written in the BASIC language are usually run through an interpreter, though some can be compiled.

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A person who interprets; specif., a person whose work is translating a foreign language orally, as in a conversation between people speaking different languages.
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A computer program that translates and executes, statement by statement, a program written in a high-level language.
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A high-level programming language translator that translates and runs the program at the same time. It converts one program statement into machine language, executes it, and then proceeds to the next statement. This differs from regular executable programs that are presented to the computer as binary-coded instructions. Interpreted programs remain in the source language the programmer wrote in, which is human readable text.Multiplatform Runtime ModulesA major advantage of an interpreted language is that it is generally able to run on more than one hardware platform. The source code is the same, but the actual interpreter software ("runtime module") converts the source into machine language. The interpreter must itself be in the native machine language of the hardware it runs in, which means changes in the language require updated interpreters for each hardware platform.Slower, But Easier to TestInterpreted programs run slower than their compiler counterparts. Whereas the compiler translates the entire program before it is run, interpreters translate a line at a time while the program is being run. However, it is very convenient to write an interpreted program, since a single line of code can be tested interactively.Some languages can be both interpreted and compiled, in which case a program may be developed with the interpreter for ease of testing and debugging and later compiled for production use. See JIT compiler.Intermediate Languages - Compiled and InterpretedLanguages such as Java and Visual Basic are compiled into an intermediate bytecode language that still requires a runtime module (see illustration below). See Java and Java virtual machine.
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Origin of interpreter

  • From Middle English, from Latin interpretor (“to explain, expound, understand”), from interpres (“agent, translator”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Displaced native Old English wealhstod.

    From Wiktionary