Epic Definition

ĕpĭk
epics
noun
epics
A long narrative poem in a dignified style about the deeds of a traditional or historical hero or heroes.
Webster's New World
Any long narrative poem regarded as having the style, structure, and importance of an epic, as Dante's Divine Comedy.
Webster's New World
A prose narrative, play, film, etc. regarded as having certain qualities of an epic, as great length, a wide variety of characters and incidents, serious themes, etc.
Webster's New World
A series of events regarded as a proper subject for an epic.
Webster's New World

(colloquial, slang, informal) Extending beyond the usual or ordinary; extraordinary, momentous, great.

The after-prom party was epic.
Wiktionary
Antonyms:
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adjective
Of an epic.
Webster's New World
Having the nature of an epic.
Webster's New World
Surpassing the usual or ordinary, particularly in scope or size.
American Heritage
Heroic and impressive in quality.
American Heritage
Synonyms:
abbreviation
(computing) Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing.
Wiktionary
(electronics) Etched and Polycrystalline carried IC.
Wiktionary
(electronics) Epitaxial Integrated Circuit.
Wiktionary
(law) Estates and Protected Individuals Code.
Wiktionary
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Other Word Forms of Epic

Noun

Singular:
epic
Plural:
epics

Origin of Epic

  • From Middle French épique, from Latin epicus, from Ancient Greek ἐπικός (epikos), from ἔπος (epos, “word, story”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin epicus from Greek epikos from epos word, song wekw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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