Float meaning

flōt
To move easily or lightly.
verb
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1
To make the surface of (plaster, for example) level or smooth.
verb
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To offer for consideration; suggest.

Floated my idea to the committee.

verb
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(economics) To allow (the exchange value of a currency, for example) to rise or fall freely in response to the market.

Inflation forced the government to float the currency.

verb
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To arrange for (a loan).
verb
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1
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The number of shares of a security that are publicly owned and traded.
noun
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To float is defined as to be suspended in water or liquid to stay near the surface, or to come into your mind, or to make a suggestion, or to fluctuate in value.

A raft that doesn't sink but that instead stays at the top of a swimming pool is an example of something that floats.

When you lay on your back in the ocean and let the salt water hold you up on the surface of the water, this is an example of when you float.

When a song you like to listen to drifts into your head, this is an example of when the song floats into your head.

When you suggest to your boss that a new timecard system might be wise, this is an example of when you float the idea.

When your mortgage is tied to the LIBOR index instead of fixed, this is an example of a time when your rate floats.

verb
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(computers) To convert (data) from fixed-point notation to floating-point notation.
verb
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Something that floats, as:
  • A raft.
  • A buoy.
  • A life preserver.
  • A buoyant object, such as a piece of cork or a plastic ball, used to hold a net or part of a fishing line afloat.
  • A landing platform attached to a wharf and floating on the water.
  • A floating ball attached to a lever to regulate the water level in a tank.
noun
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A decorated exhibit or scene mounted on a mobile platform and pulled or driven in a parade.
noun
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Anything that stays, or causes something else to stay, on the surface of a liquid or suspended near the surface.
  • An air-filled bladder, as in a fish.
  • A cork on a fishing line.
  • A floating ball or device that regulates the valve controlling water level, as in a tank, or fuel supply, as in a carburetor.
  • A raftlike platform anchored near a shore, as for use by swimmers.
  • A life preserver.
  • A buoyant device on an aircraft to enable it to land or remain on water.
noun
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(biology) An air-filled sac or structure that aids in the flotation of an aquatic organism.
noun
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(economics) To rise or fall freely in response to the market.

Allowed the dollar to float; a loan whose interest rate floats with the prime rate.

verb
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To cause to remain suspended without sinking or falling.
verb
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To flood (land), as for irrigation.
verb
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A thread that is brought to the surface of a cloth in weaving, esp. to form a pattern.
noun
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A cold beverage, typically a soft drink, served with a scoop of ice cream in it.

A root beer float.

noun
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The act or an instance of floating.
noun
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Any of the various styles of floating executed by swimmers.
noun
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The act of allowing a currency to float on the market.
noun
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(banking) The total value of checks or drafts in transit and not yet collected.
noun
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To stay on the surface of a liquid or suspended near the surface.
verb
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To drift or move slowly or easily on water, in air, etc.

Leaves floating down from the trees.

verb
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To move or drift about vaguely and without purpose.

Idle thoughts floating through the mind.

verb
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To fluctuate freely in relationship to other currencies, as determined by supply and demand.
verb
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To arrange for (a loan)
verb
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To allow the exchange value of (a currency) to fluctuate freely in relationship to other currencies.
verb
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An air-filled sac or structure that aids in the flotation of an aquatic organism.
noun
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An air-filled sac in certain aquatic organisms, such as kelp, that helps maintain buoyancy.
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In programming, a declaration of a floating point number.
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The difference between the funds that a bank has on deposit with the Federal Reserve and the funds that have been paid out of its account. Float adds to the money supply and is one of the money supply statistics collected and reported weekly by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
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The number of shares of stock available to be traded multiplied by the price of the shares. The bigger the float, the greater the stock’s liquidity.
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A buoyant device used to support something in water or another liquid.
noun
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(banking) The total amount of checks/cheques or other drafts written against a bank account but not yet cleared and charged against the account.

No sir, your current float is not taken into account, when assets are legally garnished.

noun
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(insurance) Premiums taken in but not yet paid out.

We make a lot of interest from our nightly float.

noun
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(programming) A floating-point number.

That routine should not have used an int; it should be a float.

noun
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A soft beverage with a scoop of ice-cream floating in it.

It's true - I don't consider anything other than root-beer with vanilla ice-cream to be a "real" float.

noun
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The definition of a float is a small buoyant object, or a small object attached to a fishing line to show you when a fish bites.

A raft that stays on the surface of the pool is an example of a float.

A little round object attached to your fishing pole that shows you when a fish has bitten is an example of a float.

noun
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A small sum of money put in a cashier's till at the start of business to enable change to be made.
noun
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(poker) A maneuver where a player calls on the flop or turn with a weak hand, with the intention of bluffing after a subsequent community card.
noun
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(knitting) One of the loose ends of yarn on an unfinished work.
noun
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(automotive) A car carrier or car transporter truck or truck-and-trailer combination.
noun
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(transport) A lowboy trailer.
noun
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(tempering) A device sending a copious stream of water to the heated surface of a bulky object, such as an anvil or die.

noun
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A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one foot deep.

noun
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A polishing block used in marble working; a runner.

noun
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(UK, dated) A coal cart.

noun
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(intransitive) Of an object or substance, to be supported by a liquid of greater density than the object so as that part of the object or substance remains above the surface.

The boat floated on the water.

The oil floated on the vinegar.

verb
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To cause something to be suspended in a liquid of greater density; as, to float a boat.
verb
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(intransitive) To be capable of floating.

That boat doesn’t float.

Oil floats on vinegar.

verb
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(intransitive) To move in a particular direction with the liquid in which one is floating.

I’d love to just float downstream.

verb
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(intransitive) To drift or wander aimlessly.

I’m not sure where they went... they’re floating around here somewhere.

Images from my childhood floated through my mind.

verb
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(intransitive) To drift gently through the air.

The balloon floated off into the distance.

verb
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(intransitive) To move in a fluid manner.

The dancer floated gracefully around the stage.

verb
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(intransitive, colloquial) (of an idea or scheme) To be viable.

That’s a daft idea... it’ll never float.

verb
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To propose (an idea) for consideration.

I floated the idea of free ice-cream on Fridays, but no one was interested.

verb
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(intransitive) To automatically adjust a parameter as related parameters change.
verb
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(intransitive, finance) (of currencies) To have an exchange value determined by the markets as opposed to by rule.

The yen floats against the dollar.

verb
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(finance) To allow (the exchange value of a currency) to be determined by the markets.

The government floated the pound in January.

Increased pressure on Thailand’s currency, the baht, in 1997 led to a crisis that forced the government to float the currency.

verb
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(colloquial) To extend a short-term loan to.

Could you float me $50 until payday?

verb
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(finance) To issue or sell shares in a company (units in a trust) to members of the public, followed by listing on a stock exchange.
verb
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To use a float (tool).

It is time to float this horse's teeth.

verb
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(poker) To perform a float.
verb
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To move from place to place, especially at random.
verb
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To release (a security) for sale.
verb
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A soft drink with ice cream floating in it.
noun
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Excess time allowed for a task in a project schedule.
noun
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A flat tool for smoothing or spreading cement, plaster, etc.
noun
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(now rare) To cover (land) with water; flood.
verb
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To smooth or spread (cement, plaster, etc.)
verb
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Origin of float

  • Middle English floten from Old English flotian pleu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English floten, from Old English flotian (“to float”), from Proto-Germanic *flutōną (“to float”), from Proto-Indo-European *plewd-, *plew- (“to float, swim, fly”). Cognate with Middle Low German vloten, vlotten (“to float, swim”), Middle Dutch vloten, Old Norse flota, Icelandic fljóta, Old English flēotan (“to float, swim”), Ancient Greek πλέω (pleō), Lithuanian plaukti, Russian плавать (plavatʹ).

    From Wiktionary