Camel meaning

kăm'əl
Either of two species of large, domesticated ruminants (genus Camelus) with a humped back, long neck, and large, cushioned feet: capable of storing water in its bodily tissue, the camel is the common beast of burden in Asian and African deserts.
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A watertight cylinder used to raise sunken ships, wrecks, etc.
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A float, usually consisting of a log or logs, placed alongside a wharf, pier, etc. to protect docking ships.
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Of the tan color of camel's hair.
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(Customized Application of Mobile network Enhanced Logic) A set of ETSI standards for extending landline intelligent network (IN) telephony services to the data services of GSM, GPRS and UMTS mobile systems. CAMEL functions were added in phases. Phase 1 covers basic features such as call waiting and forwarding. Phase 2 supports prepaid calling and unstructured supplementary service data (see USSD). Phase 3 supports roaming; Phase 4 adds multimedia services, and Phase 5 provides seamless prepaid roaming. See CAP.
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A beast of burden, much used in desert areas, of the genus Camelus.
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A light brownish color, tan.
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Loaded vessels lashed tightly, one on each side of a another vessel, and then emptied to reduce the draught of the ship in the middle.
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The definition of a camel is a large humped back animal with a long neck that lives in the deserts of Africa and Asia.

The animal most used for transportation in the African desert is an example of a camel.

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Either of two chiefly domesticated ruminant mammals of the genus Camelus, the Bactrian camel or the dromedary, having a humped back and long neck, and used in northern Africa, the Middle East, and Asia as a beast of burden and a source of wool, milk, and meat.
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A device used to raise sunken objects, consisting of a hollow structure that is submerged, attached tightly to the object, and pumped free of water.
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A spin in figure skating that is performed in an arabesque or modified arabesque position.
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A tan or yellowish brown.
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Origin of camel

  • Middle English from Old English and from Anglo-Norman cameil both from Latin camēlus from Greek kamēlos of Semitic origin gml1 in Semitic roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English, via Old Northern French camel (Old French chamel, modern chameau), from Latin camēlus, from Ancient Greek κάμηλος (kamēlos), from Proto-Semitic *gamal-; compare Arabic جمل (jámal) and Hebrew גמל (gamál).
    From Wiktionary