Flux meaning

flŭks
Frequency:
To flow; stream.
verb
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(medicine) The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.
noun
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(chemistry & metallurgy) A substance that aids, induces, or otherwise actively participates in fusing or flowing, as:
  • A substance applied to a surface to be joined by welding, soldering, or brazing to facilitate the flowing of solder and prevent formation of oxides.
  • A mineral added to the metals in a furnace to promote fusing or to prevent the formation of oxides.
  • An additive that improves the flow of plastics during fabrication.
  • A readily fusible glass or enamel used as a base in ceramic work.
noun
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(chemistry & metallurgy) A substance that aids, induces, or otherwise actively participates in fusing or flowing, as:
  • A substance applied to a surface to be joined by welding, soldering, or brazing to facilitate the flowing of solder and prevent formation of oxides.
  • A mineral added to the metals in a furnace to promote fusing or to prevent the formation of oxides.
  • An additive that improves the flow of plastics during fabrication.
  • A readily fusible glass or enamel used as a base in ceramic work.
noun
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The definition of a flux is a flow of liquid from the body, or a constant movement or change.

An example of flux is diarrhea.

An example of flux is an ever changing list of the responsibilities of a specific job.

noun
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Constant or frequent change; fluctuation.
noun
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(medicine) The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.
noun
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To melt; fuse.
verb
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To apply a flux to.
verb
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To become fluid.
verb
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Constant or frequent change; fluctuation.
noun
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To melt; fuse.
verb
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To apply a flux to.
verb
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To become fluid.
verb
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To flow; stream.
verb
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A flowing or flow.
noun
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The rate of flow of water, as the tide or current, through a defined area.
noun
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A continuous movement or continual change.

Fashion is always in a state of flux.

noun
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Any excessive or unnatural discharge of fluid body matter, esp. from the bowels.
noun
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(physics) The rate of flow of energy, fluids, etc. across a surface.
noun
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To make (a solid) melt.
verb
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To fuse (metals) by melting.
verb
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(archaic) To flow or stream out.
verb
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The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.
noun
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The rate of flow of fluids, particles, or energy across a given surface or area.
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The presence of a field of force in a region of space, represented as a set of lines indicating the direction of the force. The density of the lines indicates the strength of the force. Lines used to represent magnetic fields in depictions of magnets, for example, follow the lines of flux of the field.
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A measure of the strength of such a field.
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A readily fusible glass or enamel used as a base in ceramic work.
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An additive that improves the flow of plastics during fabrication.
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A substance applied to a surface to be joined by welding, soldering, or brazing to facilitate the flowing of solder and prevent formation of oxides.
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A substance used in a smelting furnace to make metals melt more easily.
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The energy field generated by a magnet. See luminous flux.
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The rate of flow of something such as energy, particles, or fluid volumes across or through a surface. Radiant flux is the time rate of energy flow of radiant energy as measures in watts or joules per second. Luminous flux is radiant flux evaluated with respect to its luminous (brightness) efficiency. See also joule, luminance, and watt.
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The strength of an energy field acting on a specific area.
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The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream.
noun
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A state of ongoing change.

The schedule is in flux at the moment.

noun
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A chemical agent for cleaning metal prior to soldering or welding.

It is important to use flux when soldering or oxides on the metal will prevent a good bond.

noun
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(physics) The rate of transfer of energy (another physical quantity) through a given surface, specifically electric flux, magnetic flux.

That high a neutron flux would be lethal in seconds.

noun
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(archaic) A disease which causes diarrhea, especially dysentery.
noun
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(archaic) Diarrhea or other fluid discharge from the body.
noun
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The state of being liquid through heat; fusion.
noun
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To use flux.

You have to flux the joint before soldering.

verb
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To melt.
verb
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To flow as a liquid.
verb
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Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable.
adjective
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Origin of flux

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin flūxus from past participle of fluere to flow bhleu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin flūxus from past participle of fluere to flow bhleu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French flux, from Latin fluxus (“flow”).

    From Wiktionary