Troop meaning

tro͝op
A group or company of people, animals, or things.
noun
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A group of persons, animals, or, formerly, things; herd, flock, band, etc.
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To walk, go, or pass at a slow, deliberate pace.

Children were trooping along the sidewalk.

verb
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A unit of Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts under an adult leader.
noun
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(loosely) A great number; lot.
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(archaic) To associate or consort.
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A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
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(military) A small unit of cavalry or armour commanded by a captain, corresponding to a platoon or company of infantry.
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A detachment of soldiers or police, especially horse artillery, armour, or state troopers.
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Soldiers, military forces (usually "troops").
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(nonstandard) A company of stageplayers; a troupe.

noun
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A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.
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A unit of girl or boy scouts.
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(mycology) Mushrooms that are in a close group but not close enough to be called a cluster.
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To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
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To march on; to go forward in haste.
verb
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To move or march as if in a crowd.

The children trooped into the room.

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A unit of at least five Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts under the guidance of an adult leader.
noun
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To move or go as a group or in large numbers.

The students trooped into the auditorium.

verb
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(archaic) A group of actors; troupe.
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To gather or go together in a throng.

The crowd trooped out of the stadium.

verb
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troop the colors
  • to parade the colors, or flag, before troops
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

troop the colors

Origin of troop

  • French troupe from Old French trope probably from Vulgar Latin troppu-

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Attested in English since 1545, from French troupe (back-formation of troupeau, diminutive of Medieval Latin troppus "flock") and Middle French trouppe (from Old French trope (“band, company, troop")), both of Germanic origin from Frankish *thorp (“assembly, gathering"), from Proto-Germanic *þurpÄ… (“village, land, estate"), from Proto-Germanic *treb- (“dwelling, settlement"). Akin to Old English þorp, þrop (“village, farm, estate") (Modern English thorp), Old Frisian þorp, Old Norse þorp. More at thorp.

    From Wiktionary