Mote meaning

mōt
Frequency:
May; might.
verb
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(archaic) May; might.
verb
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A speck of dust or other tiny particle.
noun
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(now archaic) Forming subjunctive expressions of wish: may. [from 9th c.]
verb
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A very small particle; a speck.
noun
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(now archaic) May or might. [from 9th c.]
verb
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The definition of a mote is a speck or a very small piece of something.

An example of a mote is a particle of dirt.

noun
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(reMOTE) A wireless receiver/transmitter that is typically combined with a sensor of some type to create a remote sensor. Some motes are designed to be incredibly small so that they can be deployed by the hundreds or even thousands for various applications (see smart dust).
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From Old English mot, and akin to Middle Dutch and Fris meaning sand or grit. 1. A speck of dust or other tiny particle. 2. In telecommunications, a wireless sensor so tiny as to compare to a speck of dust. About the size of a grain of sand, a mote comprises sensors, a processor, a bidirectional antenna, and a power supply.Also known as smart dust, future applications for motes are many.The military is developing motes that can be spread from the air to gather and transmit information about enemy troop movements. Civil engineers intend to embed motes in concrete to monitor and report on the condition of bridges and roadways. Spread around a warehouse housing weapons, financial records, or other sensitive materials, motes can be used to sense and report security violations.The ZigBee Alliance is involved in the development of standards for mote mesh networking. See also ZigBee and ZigBee Alliance.
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A small particle; a speck.
noun
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A tiny computer for remote sensing. Also known as smartdust.
noun
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(obsolete) A meeting for discussion.

A wardmote in the city of London.

noun
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(obsolete) A body of persons who meet for discussion, especially about the management of affairs.

A folkmote.

noun
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(obsolete) A place of meeting for discussion.
noun
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Origin of mote

  • Middle English moten from Old English mōtan med- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English mot from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English moten, from Old English mōtan (“to be allowed, be able to, have the opportunity to, be compelled to, may, must"), from Proto-Germanic *mōtanÄ… (“to be able to, have to, be delegated"), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (“to acquire, possess, be in charge of"). Cognate with Dutch moeten (“to have to, must"), German müssen (“to have to, must"), Danish mÃ¥tte (“might, may"), Ancient Greek μέδω (médō, “to prevail, dominate, rule over"). Related to empty.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English mot, from Old English mot (“grain of sand")

    From Wiktionary

  • See moot (“a meeting").

    From Wiktionary