Mite definition

mīt
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A coin of very small value, especially an obsolete British coin worth half a farthing.
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A very small contribution or amount of money.
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A widow's mite.
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A very small sum of money or contribution.
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(obs.) A coin of very small value.
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Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.
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A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. The name is also applied to the lepton, a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
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A very small object, creature, or particle.
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Any of a large subclass (Acari) of tiny, sometimes microscopic, arachnids often parasitic upon animals, insects, or plants, or infesting prepared foods, including many species that transmit diseases.
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A very small creature or object.
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Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.
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Any of various very small arachnids of the subclass Acari that often live as parasites on other animals or plants. Like ticks and unlike spiders, mites have no division between the cephalothorax and abdomen.
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A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc. See Acarina.
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A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.
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Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle. Sometimes used adverbially.
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a mite
  • To a small degree; somewhat:
    That remark was a mite unfair.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mite
Plural:
mites

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of mite

  • Middle English from Middle Dutch Middle Low German mīte a small Flemish coin, tiny animal

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English mīte

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English mite, from Old English mÄ«te (“mite, tiny insect"), from Proto-Germanic *mÄ«tÇ­ (“biting insect"; literally, "cutter"), from Proto-Germanic *maitanÄ… (“to cut"), from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (“small"). Akin to Old High German mÄ«za (“mite"), Middle Dutch mÄ«te (“moth, mite"), Dutch mijt (“moth, mite"), Danish mide (“mite").

    From Wiktionary