Nit meaning

nĭt
A measurement of the brightness of light. One nit is equal to one candela (one candlepower) per square meter (1cd/m2). The sun at noon is rated at 1.6 billion nits. Although, LCD screens range from 200 to 500 nits, our outdated TV standard is 100 nits, which was set in the days when rare earth phosphors were used in cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Various high dynamic range (HDR) technologies, such as Dolby Vision, yield 4,000 nits and above on LCD TVs. See Dolby HDR and LED TV.Nit ratings are not commonly advertised; however, in 2014, Lenovo published them for its W540 ThinkPad laptop. One model had a common 1920x1080 resolution at 220 nits, and another had a high-resolution 2880x1620 screen at 300 nits. See stilb and candela.
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A unit of luminance equal to one candela per square meter, measured perpendicular to the rays of the source.
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National Invitational Tournament.
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The egg of certain parasitic insects, especially a head louse.
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The egg of a louse or similar insect.
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A young louse, etc.
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The egg of certain parasitic insects, especially a head louse.
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The egg of a louse.
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A young louse.
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(slang) A fool, a nitwit.
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A candela per square meter.
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Origin of nit

  • From Latin nitor brightness from nitēre to shine

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English hnitu

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English nite, from Old English hnitu, from Proto-Germanic *hnitō (cf. Dutch neet, German Nisse, Norwegian nit), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱ(o)nid- (cf. Scottish Gaelic sneadh, Lithuanian glìnda, Polish gnida, Albanian thëri, Ancient Greek κονίς (konís))

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin nitere (“to shine")

    From Wiktionary