Rout meaning

rout
To put to disorderly flight or retreat.
verb
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To defeat overwhelmingly.
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The definition of a rout is a chaotic crowd of people, or a troop withdrawal.

An example of a rout is a group of people rioting in a city.

An example of a rout is soldiers scattering from the scene of a lost battle.

noun
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To rout is to dig up or turn over ground.

An example of to rout is a pig digging up truffles.

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A public disturbance; a riot.
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A fashionable gathering.
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(archaic) A group of people, especially knights, or of animals, especially wolves.
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To dig with the snout; root.
verb
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To poke around; rummage.
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To expose to view as if by digging; uncover.
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To hollow, scoop, or gouge out.
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To drive or force out as if by digging; eject.

Rout out an informant.

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(archaic) To dig up with the snout.
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To bellow. Used of cattle.
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A disorderly crowd; noisy mob; rabble.
noun
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A disorderly flight or retreat, as of defeated troops.

To be put to rout.

noun
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An overwhelming defeat.
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(archaic) A large, fashionable social gathering in the evening.
noun
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To put to disorderly flight.
verb
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To defeat overwhelmingly.
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To dig for food with the snout, as a pig; root.
verb
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To poke or rummage about.
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To dig up or turn over with the snout.
verb
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To force out.
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(intransitive) To make a noise; roar; bellow; snort.
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(intransitive) To snore; snore loudly.

verb
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(intransitive) To belch.
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(intransitive) To howl as the wind; make a roaring noise.
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(now chiefly dialectal) To beat; strike; assail with blows.
verb
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(now chiefly dialectal) A violent movement; a great or violent stir; a heavy blow; a stunning blow; a stroke.
noun
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A troop; a throng; a company; an assembly; especially, a traveling company or throng.
noun
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A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people.
noun
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The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion; -- said especially of an army defeated, broken in pieces, and put to flight in disorder or panic; also, the act of defeating and breaking up an army.

The rout of the enemy was complete.

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(law) A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof.

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A fashionable assembly, or large evening party.
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To defeat completely, forcing into disorderly retreat.
verb
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To search or root in the ground, as a swine.

verb
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To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow.
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To use a router in woodworking.
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rout out
  • to expose to view
  • to scoop, gouge, or hollow out (metal, wood, etc.)
  • to make (a person) get out
idiom
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rout up
  • to find or get by turning up or poking about
  • to make (a person) get up
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

rout out
rout up

Origin of rout

  • Middle English route from Old French troop, defeat from Vulgar Latin rupta from feminine of Latin ruptus past participle of rumpere to break reup- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English routen to roar from Old Norse rauta

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Variant of root

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English routen, ruten, from Old English hrÅ«tan (“to make a noise, whiz, snore"), also rÄ“otan, *hrÄ“otan (“to make a noise, make a noise in grief, weep, mourn, lament, wail, shed tears"), both from Proto-Germanic *hrÅ«tanÄ…, *hreutanÄ… (“to snore, snort"), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor-, *kr- (“to croak, crow"). Cognate with Middle Dutch ruyten (“to make a noise, chatter, chirp"), Middle High German rÅ«zen, rÅ«ssen (“to make a noise, rattle, buzz, snore"), Icelandic rjóta, hrjóta (“to roar, rattle, snore"). Related also to Swedish ryta (“to roar, bellow, shout"), Icelandic rauta (“to roar").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English ruten (“to rush, dart, dash, beat"), from Old Norse hrjóta (“to jump down, fall out, plunge, hurl, burst forth, rebound, fly, be flung"), from Proto-Germanic *hreutanÄ… (“to plunge, rush, hurl, shatter, fall, break"), from Proto-Indo-European *kreu- (“to fall, plunge, rush, topple"). Cognate with Middle High German rûzen (“to move quickly, storm"). Related also to Old English hrÄ“osan (“to fall, sink, fall down, go to ruin, rush, rush upon, attack"). More at rush.

    From Wiktionary

  • 1598, "disorderly retreat," from Middle French route "disorderly flight of troops," literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," literally "a broken group," from Latin rupta, feminine past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture). The verb is from 1600.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alteration of root.

    From Wiktionary