Rummage meaning

rŭmĭj
To rummage is to look through something, especially an untidy pile of something.

When you look through your messy closet to find a shirt, this is an example of a situation where you rummage through your closet.

verb
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To search thoroughly by handling, turning over, or disarranging the contents of.
verb
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To discover by searching thoroughly.
verb
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To make an energetic, usually hasty search.
verb
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A thorough search among a number of things.
noun
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To search diligently, now sometimes haphazardly, as through the contents of a receptacle.
verb
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(nautical) To arrange (cargo, goods, etc.) in the hold of a ship; to move or rearrange such goods.
verb
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(nautical) To search a vessel for smuggled goods.

After the long voyage, the customs officers rummaged the ship.

verb
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To search something thoroughly and with disregard for the way in which things were arranged.

She rummaged her purse in search of the keys.

The burglars rummaged the entire house for cash and jewellery.

verb
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(intransitive) To hastily search for something in a confined space and among many items by carelessly turning things over or pushing things aside.

She rummaged in the drawers trying to find the missing sock.

verb
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To get, find, or turn up by or as by searching thoroughly.
verb
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A confusion of miscellaneous articles.
noun
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Miscellaneous articles; odds and ends.
noun
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A rummaging, or thorough search.
noun
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To search through (a place, receptacle, etc.) thoroughly, esp. by moving the contents about, turning them over, etc.; ransack.
verb
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A thorough search, usually resulting in disorder.
noun
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An unorganized collection of miscellaneous objects; a jumble.
noun
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(nautical) A place or room for the stowage of cargo in a ship; also, the act of stowing cargo; the pulling and moving about of packages incident to close stowage; formerly written romage.
noun
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Origin of rummage

  • From earlier romage act of packing cargo from French arrumage from Old French from arumer to stow from Old Provençal arumar a- to (from Latin ad- ad–) perhaps run ship's hold (of Germanic origin reuə- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French arrumage (confer French arrimage), from arrumer (“to arrange the cargo in the hold") (confer French arrimer and Spanish arrumar).

    From Wiktionary