Flight meaning

flīt
Flight is defined as the act of flying or leaving.

An example of flight is a bird in the sky.

An example of a flight is traveling by airplane from New York to California.

An example of flight is running away from a burning building.

noun
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A swift passage or movement.

Barely noticed the flight of time.

noun
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A group of things flying through the air together.

A flight of birds, arrows, etc.

noun
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An outburst or soaring above the ordinary.

A flight of fancy.

noun
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A division of contestants grouped according to ability.
noun
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A scheduled airline run or trip into space.

The 7:00 flight to New York; the next flight of the space shuttle.

noun
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To migrate or fly in flocks.
verb
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The act, manner, or power of flying or moving through space.
noun
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The distance covered or that can be covered at one time by an airplane, bird, projectile, etc.
noun
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An airplane scheduled to fly a certain route at a certain time.
noun
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A trip by airplane or spacecraft.
noun
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A set of stairs, as between landings or floors.
noun
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A flight arrow.
noun
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To fly in numbers.
verb
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A fleeing from or as from danger.
noun
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The act of flying.

Birds are capable of flight.

noun
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An instance of flying.

The migrating birds' flight took them to Africa.

noun
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A collective term for doves or swallows.
noun
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A journey made by an aircraft, eg a balloon, plane or space shuttle, particularly one between two airports, which needs to be reserved in advance.

The flight to Paris leaves at 7 o'clock tonight.

Where is the departure gate for flight 747? / Go straight down and to the right.

noun
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The act of fleeing. (Flight is the noun which corresponds to the verb flee.)

Take flight.

noun
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A set of stairs or an escalator. A series of stairs between landings.
noun
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A floor which is reached by stairs or escalators.

How many flights is it up?

noun
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A feather on an arrow or dart used to help it follow an even path.
noun
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A paper plane.
noun
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(cricket) The movement of a spinning ball through the air - concerns its speed, trajectory and drift.
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The ballistic trajectory of an arrow or other projectile.
noun
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An aerodynamic surface designed to guide such a projectile's trajectory.
noun
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Act of fleeing of a refugee or a fugitive.
noun
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An air force unit.
noun
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Several sample glasses of a specific wine varietal or other beverage. The pours are smaller than a full glass and the flight will generally include three to five different samples.
noun
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(engineering) The shaped material forming the thread of a screw.
noun
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(obsolete) Fast, swift.
adjective
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(cricket, of a spin bowler) To throw the ball in such a way that it has more airtime and more spin than usual.
verb
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A group, especially of birds or aircraft, flying together.
noun
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A number of aircraft in the US Air Force forming a subdivision of a squadron.
noun
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A round of competition, as in a sports tournament.
noun
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An exuberant or transcendent effort or display.

A flight of the imagination; flights of oratory.

noun
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A series of stairs rising from one landing to another.
noun
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A curved plate or flange that winds in a spiral around the center shaft of an auger, designed to transport loose material upward or backward along the shaft as the auger rotates.
noun
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The act or an instance of running away; an escape.
noun
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take flight
  • To take wing, take off, etc.; become airborne and fly.
idiom
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put to flight
  • To force to flee.
idiom
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take (to) flight
  • To run away; flee.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

put to flight
take (to) flight

Origin of flight

  • Middle English from Old English flyht pleu- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English flyht pleu- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old English flyht, from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz. Cognate with Dutch vlucht and German Flucht.
    From Wiktionary