Ball meaning

bôl
To have a ball is defined as to have a good time.

An example of someone having a ball is a person dancing at a party.

noun
15
1
(vulgar slang) To have sexual intercourse.
verb
8
3
(vulgar slang) To have sexual intercourse with.
verb
7
2
To ball is defined as to make something into a spherical shape.

An example of making something into a ball is when you make cookies out of dough and place the dough in rounded shapes on the cookie sheet.

verb
3
1
To carry the ball is defined as to be accountable.

An example of someone carrying the ball is an employee doing the duties of a co-worker who is sick.

noun
3
3
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Any round, or spherical, object; sphere; globe.
noun
1
1
A formal gathering for social dancing.
noun
1
2
The definition of a ball is a round object in the shape of a sphere or any sport that uses such an object in its play.

An example of a ball is a baseball or basketball.

An example of a sport that can be referred to as ball is basketball.

noun
0
1
A rounded part or protuberance, especially of the body.

The ball of the foot.

noun
0
1
To become formed into a ball.
verb
0
1
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(informal) An extremely enjoyable time or experience.

We had a ball during our vacation.

noun
0
1
A throw or pitch of a ball.
noun
0
1
A rounded part of the body; specif., the rounded area (ball of the foot) formed along the first joints of the toes when the foot is arched.
noun
0
1
(baseball) A pitch that is wide of the plate or goes above the armpit (or shoulder in slow-pitch softball) or below the knee of the batter, who does not swing at it: four balls allow the batter to go to first base.
noun
0
1
(hort.) The roots of a plant, bound and packed for shipping.
noun
0
1
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To form into a ball.
verb
0
1
(slang) To have sexual intercourse (with)
verb
0
1
A formal social dance.
noun
0
1
(slang) An enjoyable time, event, or experience.
noun
0
1
(person) Died 1381; Eng. priest: executed as an instigator of the Peasants' Revolt of 1381
proper name
0
1
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(person) 1911-89; U.S. comedienne and actress.
proper name
0
1
(slang) A person characterized, usually figuratively, by (a specified negative quality)

A slimeball gambler.

affix
0
1
A rounded part or protuberance, especially of the body.

The ball of the foot.

noun
0
1
A solid or hollow sphere, or part thereof.
noun
0
1
noun
0
1
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A formal dance.
noun
0
1
(informal) A very enjoyable time.

I had a ball at that concert.

noun
0
1
A surname​.
pronoun
0
1
To get on the ball is defined as to do what you are supposed to, or to stop silly behavior.

An example of someone getting on the ball is a student doing his classwork instead of playing with a friend.

noun
0
2
To form into a ball.
verb
0
2
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A planet or star, esp. the earth.
noun
0
2
(vulgar slang) have
  • To have control over someone; have someone at one's mercy.
idiom
0
1
(informal) on the ball
  • Alert, competent, or efficient:
    A teacher who is really on the ball.
  • Relating to qualities, such as competence, skill, or knowledge, that are necessary for success:
    A manager who has a lot on the ball; a student who has nothing on the ball.
idiom
0
1
ball up
  • to muddle or bungle
idiom
0
1
be on the ball
  • to be alert; be efficient
idiom
0
1
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carry the ball
  • to assume responsibility; take command
idiom
0
1
get (or keep) the ball rolling
  • to start (or maintain) some action
idiom
0
1
have something on the ball
  • to have ability
idiom
0
1
play ball
  • to begin or resume playing a ballgame
  • to begin or resume any activity
  • to cooperate
idiom
0
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

be on the ball
carry the ball
get (<i>or</i> keep) the ball rolling
have something on the ball

Origin of ball

  • French bal from Old French from baller to dance from Late Latin ballāre from Greek ballizein gwelə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bal probably from Old English beall bhel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bal, ball, balle, from Old English *beall, *bealla (“round object, ball”) or Old Norse bǫllr (“a ball”) (whence the Icelandic böllur (“scrotum; penis; a ball”)), both from Proto-Germanic *balluz, *ballô (“ball”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoln- (“bubble”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (“to blow, inflate, swell”). Cognate with Old Saxon ball, Dutch bal, Old High German bal, ballo (German Ball (“ball”); Ballen (“bale”)). Related forms in Romance are borrowings from Germanic. See also balloon, bale.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French bal, from Late Latin ballare.

    From Wiktionary