Tide meaning

tīd
A stream, current, etc. or trend, tendency, etc.

The tide of public opinion.

noun
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Something that rises and falls like the tide.
noun
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To rise and fall like the tide.
verb
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The period during which something is at its highest or fullest point.
noun
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An opportune time or occasion.
noun
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adjective
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To flow or surge like a tide.
verb
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To carry with or as with the tide.
verb
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To betide; happen.
verb
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The periodic change of the sea level, particularly when caused by the gravitational influence of the sun and the moon.
noun
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A stream, current or flood.

Let in the tide of knaves once more; my cook and I'll provide. "” Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, III-iv.

noun
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Something which changes like the tides of the sea.
noun
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Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.

There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. "” Shakespeare. Julius Caesar, IV-iii.

noun
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What should us tide of this new law? "” Chaucer.
verb
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(mining) The period of twelve hours.
noun
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To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.
verb
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(intransitive) To pour a tide or flood.

The ocean tided most impressively, even frightening.

verb
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(intransitive, nautical) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.
verb
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Time, added to a festival name to indicate the period around that festival.
suffix
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The definition of tide is the cycle of rising and falling of the surface of bodies of water caused by the attraction of the moon and the sun.

An example of the tide is when the ocean's water is at its highest point on the beach.

noun
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Tidal force.
noun
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A time or season. Often used in combination.

Eventide; Christmastide; Shrovetide.

noun
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A favorable occasion; an opportunity.
noun
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To carry along with the tide.
verb
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To betide; befall.
verb
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A period of time.

Eastertide, eventide.

noun
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The regular rise and fall in the surface level of the Earth's oceans, seas, and bays caused by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and to a lesser extent of the Sun. The maximum high tides (or spring tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are directly aligned with Earth, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters is along the same line and is reinforced. The lowest high tides (or neap tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are at right angles to each other, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters originates from two different directions and is mitigated. Tides vary greatly by region and are influenced by sea-floor topography, storms, and water currents.
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To drift or ride with the tide.

Tided off the reef; tiding up the Hudson.

verb
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tide over
  • To help along temporarily, as through a period of difficulty.
idiom
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turn the tide
  • To reverse a condition.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of tide

  • Middle English from Old English tīd division of time dā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tiden from Old English tīdan dā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tide, from Old English tÄ«d (“time, period, season, while; hour; feast-day, festal-tide; canonical hour or service"), from Proto-Germanic *tÄ«diz (“time, period"), from Proto-Indo-European *dÄ«ti- (“time, period"), from Proto-Indo-European *dÄ«- (“time"). Cognate with Scots tide, tyde (“moment, time, occasion, period, tide"), North Frisian tid (“time"), West Frisian tiid (“time, while"), Dutch tijd (“time"), Low German Tied (“time"), Tiet, Low German Tide (“tide of the sea"), German Zeit (“time"), Danish tid (“time"), Swedish tid (“time"), Icelandic tíð (“time"), Albanian ditë (“day"), Old Armenian Õ¿Õ« (ti, “age"), Kurdish dem (“time"). Related to time.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English tiden, tide, from Old English tÄ«dan (“to happen").
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English tid, from Old High German zit
    From Wiktionary