Direction meaning

dĭ-rĕkshən, dī-
Frequency:
The action of directing; pointing (something) or looking towards.

What direction is the railway station?

noun
22
3
The management, supervision, or guidance of a group or operation.

The manager's direction of the sales campaign has been highly effective.

noun
19
8
The point toward which something faces or the line along which something moves or lies.

“north,” “up,” “forward,” and “left” are directions.

noun
17
5
The path or course of a given movement, or moving body; an indication of the point toward or from which an object is moving.

Keep going in the same direction.

noun
15
5

The trombonist looked to the bandleader for direction.

noun
13
3
Advertisement
The act of directing; management; supervision.
noun
7
3
(archaic) An address.
noun
6
4
The art or action of directing a musical or theatrical production.
noun
6
6
An authoritative order or command.
noun
5
1
An aspect, line of development, way, trend, etc.

Research in new directions.

noun
5
3
Advertisement
Direction is defined as the path that something takes, the path that must be taken to reach a specific place, the way in which something is starting to develop or the way you are facing.

An example of direction is when you go right instead of left.

An example of direction is knowledge of where you are going and how to get where you want to end up.

An example of direction is when a plan starts to go wrong.

An example of direction is when you climb to the top of a mountain and can see 360 degrees around you.

noun
4
5
The work of the director in cinema or theater; the skill of directing a film, play etc.

The screenplay was good, but the direction was weak.

noun
4
5
Instructions for doing, operating, using, preparing, etc.
noun
3
2
A course or line of development; a tendency toward a particular end or goal.

Charting a new direction for the company.

noun
1
3

Origin of direction

  • Middle English arrangement from Latin dīrēctiō dīrēctiōn- from dīrēctus past participle of dīrigere to direct direct

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin dīrēctiō.

    From Wiktionary