Ebb meaning

ĕb
To ebb means to move out further into the sea and further from land or to gradually decline or lessen.

An example of ebb is when a wave moves out to sea.

When you were interested in learning about science but then you began to get bored and your interest lessened, this is a situation where your interest in science began to ebb.

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Ebb is defined as the movement of the tide out to the sea.

An example of ebb is the movement of tide water out to the ocean or sea.

noun
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The receding or outgoing tide, occurring between the time when the tide is highest and the time when the following tide is lowest.
noun
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A period of decline or diminution.
noun
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To fall back from the flood stage.
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To fall away or back; decline or recede.
verb
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The flow of water back toward the sea, as the tide falls.
noun
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A weakening or lessening; decline.

The ebb of faith.

noun
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To flow back; recede, as the tide.
verb
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To weaken or lessen; decline.
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The receding movement of the tide.

The boats will go out on the ebb.

noun
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A gradual decline.
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A low state; a state of depression.
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A European bunting, Emberiza miliaria.
noun
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To flow back or recede.

The tides ebbed at noon.

verb
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To fall away or decline.

The dying man's strength ebbed away.

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To fish with stakes and nets that serve to prevent the fish from getting back into the sea with the ebb.
verb
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To cause to flow back.

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The water there is otherwise very low and ebb. (Holland)

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Origin of ebb

  • Middle English ebbe from Old English ebba apo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ebbe, from Old English ebba (“ebb, tide”), from Proto-Germanic *abjô, *abjōn (compare West Frisian ebbe, Dutch eb, German Ebbe, Old Norse efja (“countercurrent”), from Proto-Germanic *ab (“off, away”), from Proto-Indo-European *apó. (compare Old English af). More at of, off.

    From Wiktionary