Languish definitions

lăng'gwĭsh
To lose vigor or vitality; fail in health; become weak; droop.
verb
47
1
To live under distressing conditions; continue in a state of suffering.

To languish in poverty.

verb
44
0
To be or become weak or feeble; lose strength or vigor.

Crops languishing from a lack of rain.

verb
41
0
To lose intensity, impetus, enthusiastic support, etc.

A bill languishing in a congressional committee.

verb
41
1
To exist or continue in miserable or disheartening conditions.

Languished away in prison.

verb
38
0
To suffer with longing; pine.
verb
38
0
To remain unattended or be neglected.

Legislation that continued to languish in committee.

verb
35
0
To put on an air of sentimental tenderness or wistful melancholy.
verb
35
1
To become downcast or pine away in longing.

Languish apart from friends and family; languish for a change from dull routine.

verb
32
0
The definition of languish is to fail to advance or move forward, or to grow weak.

An example of languish is a project that just sits on the shelf and never gets finished.

An example of languish is a plant that is never watered and that gets sicker and sicker.

verb
6
0
(intransitive) To lose strength and become weak; to be in a state of weakness or sickness. [from 14th c.]
verb
2
0
(intransitive) To pine away in longing for something; to have low spirits, especially from lovesickness. [from 14th c.]

He languished without his girlfriend.

verb
2
0
(intransitive) To live in miserable or disheartening conditions. [from 15th c.]

He languished in prison for years.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be neglected; to make little progress, be unsuccessful. [from 17th c.]

The case languished for years before coming to trial.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, now rare) To affect a languid air, especially disingenuously. [from 18th c.]

verb
0
0

Origin of languish

From the participle stem of Anglo-Norman and Middle French languir, from Late Latin languire, alteration of Latin languēre (“to be faint, unwell”). Compare languor.