Press meaning

prĕs
To press is defined as to push or apply steady force or squeeze.

An example of to press is pushing a button on a blender to make it start.

An example of to press is ironing wrinkles out of a shirt.

An example of to press is to squeeze the juice out of grapes to make wine.

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Press is a machine that uses pressure to print or squeeze, or a person or business involved with news or media.

An example of a press is a printing press.

An example of the press is The Washington Post.

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To lift (a weight) to a position above the head without moving the legs.
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To exert force or pressure.

Felt the backpack pressing on her shoulders.

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To be worrisome or depressing; weigh heavily.

Guilt pressed upon his conscience.

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To continue a course of action, especially in spite of difficulties.

Decided to press ahead with the performance even with a sore throat.

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To require haste or urgent action.

Matters that have not stopped pressing.

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To employ urgent persuasion or entreaty.

The supervisor has been pressing to get us to finish the project sooner.

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To iron clothes or other material.
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To raise or lift a weight in a press.
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To employ a press.
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In golf, to try to hit long or risky shots, typically with unsuccessful results.
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Any of various machines or devices that apply pressure.

A cider press.

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A printing press.
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An act of pressing down or applying pressure.

With the press of a button.

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The haste or urgency of business or matters.

The press of the day's events.

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The set of proper creases in a garment or fabric, formed by ironing.
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An upright closet or case used for storing clothing, books, or other articles.
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A lift in weightlifting in which the weight is raised to shoulder level and then steadily pushed straight overhead without movement of the legs.
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An aggressive defense tactic in which players guard opponents closely, often over the entire court.
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To force into service in the army or navy; impress.
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Conscription or impressment into service, especially into the army or navy.
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An official warrant for impressing men into military service.
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To act on with steady force or weight; push steadily against; squeeze.
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To depress or touch (a button, key, etc.) as in using an elevator, keyboard, etc.
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To embrace closely.
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To force; compel; constrain.
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To urge or request earnestly or persistently; entreat; importune.
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To impose by persistent entreaty; try to force.

To press a gift on a friend.

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To lay stress on; be insistent about; emphasize.
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To distress or trouble; harass.
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To urge on; drive quickly.
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To shape (a phonograph record, metal or plastic products, etc.) by use of a form or matrix.
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To crowd; throng.
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To exert pressure.
  • To weigh down; bear heavily.
  • To go forward with energetic or determined effort.
  • To force one's way.
  • To crowd; throng.
  • To be urgent or insistent.
  • To try too hard.
    He strikes out often because he is pressing.
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To react to being pressed, or ironed.

This fabric presses well.

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To iron clothes, etc.
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A pressing or being pressed; pressure, urgency, etc.
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A crowd; throng.
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An instrument or machine by which something is crushed, squeezed, stamped, smoothed, etc. by pressure.
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A viselike device in which a tennis racket, etc. can be stored to keep it from warping.
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The condition of clothes as to smoothness, creases, etc. after pressing.
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A cabinet for storing clothes or other articles; wardrobe, cupboard, etc.
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A defensive tactic in which offensive players are guarded very closely, usually over the full court.
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A lift in which the barbell or weight is pushed away from the body using the arms or legs.
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To force into military or naval service; impress.
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To force or urge into any kind of service.
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To use in a way different from the ordinary, esp. in an emergency.
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An impressment, or forcing into service, esp. naval or military service.
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An order for impressing recruits.
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(countable) A device used to apply pressure to an item.
  • (countable) A printing machine.
    Stop the presses!.

A flower press.

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(uncountable) A collective term for the print-based media (both the people and the newspapers).

This article appeared in the press.

According to a member of the press.

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(countable) A publisher.
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(countable) (especially in Ireland and Scotland) An enclosed storage space (e.g. closet, cupboard).

Put the cups in the press.

Put the ironing in the linen press.

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(countable, weightlifting) An exercise in which weight is forced away from the body by extension of the arms or legs.
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(countable, wagering) An additional bet in a golf match that duplicates an existing (usually losing) wager in value, but begins even at the time of the bet.

He can even the match with a press.

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(countable) Pure, unfermented grape juice.

I would like some Concord press with my meal tonight.

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A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.
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(intransitive) To exert weight or force against, to act upon with with force or weight.
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To press fruit for the purpose of extracting the juice.

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To clasp, hold in an embrace; to hug.

She took her son, and press'd.

The illustrious infant to her fragrant breast (Dryden, Illiad, VI. 178.)

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To reduce to a particular shape or form by pressure, especially flatten or smooth.

To press cloth with an iron.

To press a hat.

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(sewing) To flatten a selected area of fabric using an iron with an up-and-down, not sliding, motion, so as to avoid disturbing adjacent areas.
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To drive or thrust by pressure, to force in a certain direction.

To press a crowd back.

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To force to a certain end or result; to urge strongly, impel.
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To try to force (something upon someone); to urge or inculcate.

To press the Bible on an audience.

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To hasten, urge onward.

To press a horse in a race.

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God heard their prayers, wherein they earnestly pressed him for the honor of his great name. (Winthrop, Hist. New England, II. 35)

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To lay stress upon, emphasize.

If we read but a very little, we naturally want to press it all; if we read a great deal, we are willing not to press the whole of what we read, and we learn what ought to be pressed and what not. (M. Arnold, Literature and Dogma, Pref.)

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(intransitive) To throng, crowd.
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To force into service, particularly into naval service.
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go to press
  • To be submitted for printing.
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in press
  • Submitted for printing; in the process of being printed.
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press charges
  • To bring a formal accusation of criminal wrongdoing against someone.
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pressed for time
  • In a hurry; under time pressure.
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press the flesh
  • To shake hands and mingle with many people, especially while campaigning for public office.
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go to press
  • To start to be printed or to begin printing.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

go to press
in press
go to press

Origin of press

  • Alteration of obsolete prest to hire for military service by advance payment from Middle English enlistment money, loan from Old French from prester to lend from Medieval Latin praestāre from Latin to furnish from praestō present, at hand ghes- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English pressen from Old French presser from Latin pressāre frequentative of premere to press per-4 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English pressen (“to crowd, thring, press"), from Old French presser (“to press") (Modern French presser) from Latin pressāre from pressus, past participle of premere "to press". Displaced native Middle English thringen (“to press, crowd, throng") (from Old English þringan (“to press, crowd")), Middle English thrasten (“to press, force, urge") (from Old English þrÇ£stan (“to press, force")), Old English þryscan (“to press"), Old English þȳwan (“to press, impress").
    From Wiktionary
  • Middle English presse (“throng, crowd, clothespress"), partially from Old English press (“clothespress"), from Medieval Latin pressa, and partially from Old French presse (Modern French presse) from Old French presser (“to press"), from Latin pressāre from pressus, past participle of premere "to press". Displaced native Middle English thring (“press, crowd, throng") (from Old English þring (“a press, crowd, anything that presses or confines")).
    From Wiktionary