Legion meaning

lē'jən
The major unit of the Roman army consisting of 3,000 to 6,000 infantry troops and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
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The definition of a legion is an army or other large number of people.

An example of legion is one thousand US Army troops.

An example of legion is hundreds of fans showing up to an author's book signing.

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A large military unit trained for combat; an army.
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A large number; a multitude.
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(military, Ancient Rome) The major unit or division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 infantry soldiers and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
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A national organization of former members of the armed forces.
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Constituting a large number; multitudinous.

Her admirers were legion. His mistakes were legion.

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A military division varying at times from 3,000 to 6,000 foot soldiers, with additional cavalrymen.
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A large group of soldiers; army.
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A large number; multitude.

A legion of admirers.

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American Legion, Foreign Legion, etc.
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Numerous; many.

Her honors were legion.

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Numerous; vast; very great in number; multitudinous.

Russia's labor and capital resources are woefully inadequate to overcome the state's needs and vulnerabilities, which are legion.

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A large military or semimilitary unit trained for combat; any military force; an army, regiment; an armed, organized and assembled militia.
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(often Legion or the Legion) A national organization or association of former servicemen, such as the American Legion, founded in 1919.
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A large number of people; a multitude.
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(often plural) A great number.

Where one sin has entered, legions will force their way through the same breach. "” John Rogers (1679-1729) Google Books.

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(dated, taxonomy) A group of orders inferior to a class; in scientific classification, a term occasionally used to express an assemblage of objects intermediate between an order and a class.
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Origin of legion

  • Middle English legioun from Old French legion from Latin legiō legiōn- from legere to gather leg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Attested (in Middle English, as legioun) around 1200, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legionem, from legere (“to gather, collect"); akin to legend, lecture.
    From Wiktionary
  • Generalized sense of “a large number" is due to (inaccurate) translations of allusive phrase in Mark 5:9
    From Wiktionary