Maniple meaning

mănə-pəl
An ornamental silk band hung as an ecclesiastical vestment on the left arm near the wrist.
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A subdivision of an ancient Roman legion, containing 60 or 120 men.
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A subdivision of the ancient Roman legion; one third of a cohort, consisting of either 60 or 120 men.
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A small cloth band formerly worn hanging from the left forearm by the celebrant of a Mass.
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(rare) A handful.
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A division of the Roman army numbering 60 or 120 men exclusive of officers, any small body of soldiers; a company.
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Originally, a napkin; later, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church, and sometimes worn in the English Church service.
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Origin of maniple

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin manipulus handful manus hand man-2 in Indo-European roots -pulus perhaps -ful pelə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the Middle English maniple, manyple, manaple, from the Old French maniple, manipule (manipule in Modern French), from the Latin manipulus (“handful", “troop of soldiers"), from manus (“hand") + the weakened root of pleō (“I fill").

    From Wiktionary