Leg meaning

lĕg
One of the branches of a forked or jointed object.
noun
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The part of a garment, especially of a pair of trousers, that covers the leg.
noun
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(mathematics) Either side of a right triangle that is not the hypotenuse.
noun
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The definition of a leg is a part of the body used to stand and walk or a support at the bottom of a piece of furniture.

An example of leg is the part of the body that humans move to walk.

An example of leg is one of the four supports that touch the floor on a chair.

noun
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A supporting part resembling a leg in shape or function.
noun
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The narrow streams of swirled wine or spirits that run slowly down along the inside of a glass, often believed to indicate that the liquid is full-bodied.
noun
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(slang) The ability to last or sustain success, especially by appealing to an audience.

A blockbuster movie that has legs.

noun
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To go on foot; walk or run. Often used with the indefinite it .

Because we missed the bus, we had to leg it across town.

verb
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Legate.
abbreviation
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Legato.
abbreviation
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One of the parts of the body by means of which animals stand and walk, specif., in human beings,
  • One of the lower limbs.
  • (anat.) The part of either lower limb from the knee to the foot.
noun
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A cut of meat consisting of the leg or its lower part.
noun
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The part of slacks, a stocking, etc. that covers the leg.
noun
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Anything that resembles a leg in shape or use.
  • A bar or pole used as a support or prop.
  • Any of the supports of a piece of furniture.
  • Any of the branches of a forked or jointed object.
noun
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The run made by a sailing vessel on one tack.
noun
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Any of the stages of a journey or other course.
noun
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(slang) A sustained ability to attract audiences.
noun
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(cricket) That part of the field which lies to the left and back of the batsman.
noun
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(math.) Either of the sides of a triangle other than its base or, in a right triangle, other than its hypotenuse.
noun
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(informal) To walk or run.
verb
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Legal.
abbreviation
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Legato.
abbreviation
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Legislative.
abbreviation
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Legislature.
abbreviation
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A supporting part resembling a leg in shape or function.
noun
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A segment or portion of an end-to-end path associated with a call. For example, an international voice telephone call via the public switched telephone network (PSTN) has an originating leg supported by a local exchange carrier (LEC) in one nation, a terminating leg supported by a LEC in another nation, and an international leg supported by an interexchange carrier (IXC) that interconnects the two national LECs. See also IXC, LEC, and PSTN.
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The lower limb of a human being or animal that extends from the groin to the ankle.

Dan won't be able to come to the party, since he broke his leg last week and is now on crutches.

noun
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(anatomy) The portion of the lower appendage of a human that extends from the knee to the ankle.
noun
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A part of garment, such as a pair of trousers/pants, that covers a leg.

The left leg of these jeans has a tear.

noun
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A stage of a journey, race etc.

After six days, we're finally in the last leg of our cross-country trip.

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(nautical) A distance that a sailing vessel does without changing the sails from one side to the other.
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(nautical) One side of a multiple-sided (often triangular) course in a sailing race.
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(sports) A single game or match played in a tournament or other sporting contest.
noun
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One of the two sides of a right triangle that is not the hypotenuse.
noun
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A rod-like protrusion from an inanimate object, supporting it from underneath.

The legs of a chair or table.

noun
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(usually used in plural) Evidence, the ability of a thing or idea to stick around or persist.
noun
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(UK, slang, archaic) A disreputable sporting character; a blackleg.
noun
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An extension of a steam boiler downward, in the form of a narrow space between vertical plates, sometimes nearly surrounding the furnace and ash pit, and serving to support the boiler; called also water leg.
noun
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In a grain elevator, the case containing the lower part of the belt which carries the buckets.
noun
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(cricket) A fielder whose position is on the outside, a little in rear of the batter.
noun
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To put a series of three or more options strikes into the stock market.
verb
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To remove the legs from an animal carcass.
verb
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To build legs onto a platform or stage for support.
verb
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A stage of a journey or course, especially:
  • (nautical) The distance traveled by a sailing vessel on a single tack.
  • The part of an air route or a flight pattern that is between two successive stops, positions, or changes in direction.
  • One of several contests that must be successfully completed in order to determine the winner of a competition.
  • (sports) One stretch of a relay race.
noun
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(slang) a leg to stand on
  • A justifiable or logical basis for defense; support:
    He doesn't have a leg to stand on in this debate.
idiom
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(slang) a leg up
  • The act or an instance of assisting; a boost.
  • A position of advantage; an edge:
    We have a leg up on the competition.
idiom
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on (one's) last legs
  • At the end of one's strength or resources; ready to collapse, fail, or die.
idiom
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get up on one's hind legs
  • to become assertive, belligerent, etc.
idiom
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not have a leg to stand on
  • to have absolutely no defense, excuse, or justification
idiom
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on one's last legs
  • not far from exhaustion, death, breakdown, etc.
idiom
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pull someone's leg
  • to tease or fool someone, esp. in a playful manner
idiom
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(slang) shake a leg
  • to hurry
  • to dance
idiom
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stretch one's legs
  • to walk, esp. after sitting a long time
idiom
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take to one's legs
  • to run away
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of leg

  • Middle English from Old Norse leggr

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leg, from Old Norse leggr (“leg, calf, bone of the arm or leg, hollow tube, stalk"), from Proto-Germanic *lagjaz, *lagwijaz (“leg, thigh"), from Proto-Indo-European *(ǝ)lak-, *lÄ“k- (“leg; the main muscle of the arm or leg"). Cognate with Scots leg (“leg"), Icelandic leggur (“leg, limb"), Norwegian legg (“leg"), Swedish lägg (“leg, shank, shaft"), Danish læg (“leg"), Lombardic lagi (“thigh, shank, leg"), Latin lacertus (“limb, arm"), Persian لنگ (leng).

    From Wiktionary