Fraction meaning

frăkshən
Frequency:
(mathematics) An expression that indicates the quotient of two quantities, such as13 .
noun
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5
A disconnected piece; a fragment.
noun
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3
A small part; a bit.

Moved a fraction of a step.

noun
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The definition of a fraction is a mathematical expression with a numerator and a denominator, a disconnected piece or a small part of something.

An example of fraction is one third.

An example of fraction is a piece of glass that fell from a broken window.

An example of fraction is a piece of pie.

noun
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4
A chemical component separated by fractionation.
noun
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An expression that indicates the quotient of two quantities.
noun
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A disconnected piece; a fragment.
noun
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A part of a whole, especially a comparatively small part.
noun
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A chemical component separated by fractionation.
noun
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1
An aliquot portion or any portion.
noun
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A number that compares part of an object or a set with the whole, especially the quotient of two whole numbers written in the form a/b . The fraction1 /2 , which means 1 divided by 2, can represent such things as 10 pencils out of a box of 20, or 50 cents out of a dollar.
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1
A chemical component separated by fractionation.
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A breaking or dividing, specif., of the Host in the Mass.
noun
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(chem.) A part separated by fractional crystallization, distillation, etc.
noun
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To separate into fractions.
verb
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A ratio of two numbers, the numerator and the denominator, usually written one above the other and separated by a horizontal bar.
noun
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(chemistry) A component of a mixture, separated by fractionation.
noun
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In a eucharistic service, the breaking of the host.
noun
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A small amount.
noun
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The act of breaking, or state of being broken, especially by violence.
noun
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To divide or break into fractions.
verb
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Origin of fraction

  • Middle English fraccioun a breaking from Anglo-Norman from Late Latin frāctiō frāctiōn- from Latin frāctus past participle of frangere to break bhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fraccioun (“a breaking”), from Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Medieval Latin fractio (“a fragment, portion”), from earlier Latin fractio (“a breaking, a breaking into pieces”), from fractus (English fracture), past participle of frangere (“to break”) (whence English frangible), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrag- (English break).

    From Wiktionary