Carve meaning

kärv
To carve is to slice, to divide up, or to make something smaller by cutting or chiseling.

An example of carve is to cut apart a turkey on Thanksgiving.

An example of carve is to break a large piece of property into smaller lots.

An example of carve is to create a wooden sculpture using wood tools.

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To engrave or cut figures as an art, hobby, or trade.
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To disjoint, slice, and serve meat or poultry.
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To carve turns, as when skiing.
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To make or shape by or as by cutting, chipping, hewing, etc.

Carve a statue out of wood, carve out a career for oneself.

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To decorate the surface of with cut figures or designs.
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To divide by cutting; slice.

To carve meat.

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To divide into portions, as land.
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To carve statues or designs.
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To carve meat.
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(archaic) To cut.
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To cut meat in order to serve it.
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To shape to sculptural effect; to produce (a work) by cutting, or to cut (a material) into a finished work.

To carve a name into a tree.

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(snowboarding) To perform a series of turns without pivoting, so that the tip and tail of the snowboard take the same path.
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(figuratively) To produce something using skill.
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(obsolete) A carucate.

Half a carve of arable land.

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To cut into a desired shape; fashion by cutting.

Carve the wood into a figure.

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To make or form by or as if by cutting.

Carve initials in the bark; carved out an empire.

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To decorate by cutting and shaping carefully.
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To make (a turn or turns) smoothly and without skidding, as when skiing or riding a snowboard, by leaning sharply into the direction of the turn.
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Origin of carve

  • Middle English kerven from Old English ceorfan gerbh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English kerven, from Old English ċeorfan, from Proto-Germanic *kerbaną (compare Kyrgyz kerve, Dutch kerven, German kerben (“to notch”)), from Proto-Indo-European *gerebh- (“to scratch”) (cf. Old Prussian gīrbin ‘number’, Old Church Slavonic žrĕbĭjĭ ‘lot, tallymark’, Ancient Greek γράφειν (gráphein) ‘to scratch, etch’).
    From Wiktionary