Shape meaning

shāp
Any of the forms, structures, etc. in which a thing may exist.

Dangers of every shape.

noun
2
1
Definite, regular, or suitable form; orderly arrangement.

To begin to take shape.

noun
2
1
To give definite shape to; make, as by cutting or molding material.
verb
2
1
To arrange, fashion, express, or devise (a plan, answer, etc.) in definite form.
verb
2
1
To adapt or adjust.

To shape one's plans to one's abilities.

verb
2
1
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To direct or conduct (one's life, the course of events, etc.)
verb
2
1
That quality of a thing which depends on the relative position of all points composing its outline or external surface; physical or spatial form.
noun
2
4
To shape is to mold something or someone.

An example of shape is when you mold clay.

An example of shape is when you set the design of a project.

An example of shape is when you influence a child's future.

verb
2
5
An imaginary or spectral form; phantom.
noun
1
1
Something having a particular shape, used as a mold or basis for shaping or fashioning.
noun
1
1
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Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers, Europe.
abbreviation
1
1
The status or condition of something.

The used bookshop wouldn't offer much due to the poor shape of the book.

noun
1
1
Condition of personal health, especially muscular health.

The vet checked to see what kind of shape the animal was in.

We exercise to keep in good physical shape.

noun
1
1
The appearance of something, especially its outline.

He cut a square shape out of the cake.

noun
1
1
A figure with unspecified appearance; especially a geometric figure.

What shape shall we use for the cookies? Stars, circles, or diamonds?

noun
1
1
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noun
0
1
See also shape.
hyponyms
0
1
To give something a shape and definition.

Shape the dough into a pretzel. For my art project, I plan to shape my clay lump into a bowl.

verb
0
1
To form or manipulate something into a certain shape.
verb
0
1
(of a country, person, etc) To give influence to.
verb
0
1
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The definition of a shape is a specific form, a particular condition, the outline of something you can see even when you cannot clearly make out what it is, or to a something cut out of paper.

An example of a shape is a square diamond.

An example of shape is a state of ill health.

An example of shape is when you see the shadow of a figure but can't make out who it is.

An example of shape is a circle cut out of construction paper.

noun
0
2
Something, such as a mold or pattern, used to give or determine form.
noun
0
2
To create or fashion, as:
  • To give a particular form to (a material).
    Shape the dough into baguettes.
  • To create or configure, as from a material.
    A sculpture that was shaped out of ice.
verb
0
2
To cause to conform to a particular form.

A pool that is shaped like an hourglass; a bone that is shaped to bear weight.

verb
0
2
The form characteristic of a particular person or thing, or class of things.
noun
0
2
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The contour of the body, exclusive of the face; figure.
noun
0
2
Assumed or feigned appearance; guise.

A foe in the shape of a friend.

noun
0
2
To appoint or decree.
verb
0
2
To become suited; conform.
verb
0
2
To happen.
verb
0
2
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To take shape or form.
verb
0
2
To suit; to be adjusted or conformable.

verb
0
2
shape up
  • To develop to a definite form, condition, etc.
  • To develop satisfactorily or favorably.
  • To do what is expected of one; behave as required.
idiom
0
1
take shape
  • To begin to have definite form, condition, etc.
idiom
0
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of shape

  • Middle English from Old English gesceap a creation

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English shap, schape, from Old English Ä¡esceap (“shape, form, created being, creature, creation, dispensation, fate, condition, sex, gender, genitalia"), from Proto-Germanic *ga- + *skapÄ… (“shape, nature, condition"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- (“to split, cut"). Cognate with Middle Dutch schap (“form"), Middle High German geschaf (“creature"), Icelandic skap (“state, condition, temper, mood").

    From Wiktionary

  • The verb is from Middle English shapen, schapen, from Old English scieppan (“to shape, form, make, create, assign, arrange, destine, order, adjudge"), from Proto-Germanic *skapjanÄ… (“to create"), from the noun. Cognate with Dutch scheppen, German schaffen, Swedish skapa (“to create, make").

    From Wiktionary