Forge meaning

fôrj
The definition of a forge is a furnace or workshop where metals are heated.

An example of a forge is the local iron-smith.

noun
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To give form or shape to, especially by means of careful effort.

Forge a treaty; forge a close relationship.

verb
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To work at a forge or smithy.
verb
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To make a forgery or counterfeit.
verb
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To advance gradually but steadily.

Forged ahead through throngs of shoppers.

verb
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To advance with an abrupt increase of speed.

Forged into first place with seconds to go.

verb
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A furnace for heating metal to be wrought.
noun
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A place where metal is heated and hammered or wrought into shape; smithy.
noun
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A place where wrought iron is made from pig iron or iron ore.
noun
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To form or shape (metal) with blows or pressure from a hammer, press, or other machine, usually after heating.
verb
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To make (something) by or as by this method; form; shape; produce.
verb
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To make (something false) or imitate (something genuine) for purposes of deception or fraud; esp., to counterfeit (a check, signature, etc.)
verb
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To work at a forge.
verb
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To commit forgery.
verb
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To move forward steadily, as if against difficulties.
verb
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To move in a sudden spurt of speed and energy.
verb
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Furnace or hearth where metals are heated prior to hammering them into shape.
noun
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Workshop in which metals are shaped by heating and hammering them.
noun
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The act of beating or working iron or steel.
noun
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(metallurgy) To shape a metal by heating and hammering.
verb
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To form or create with concerted effort.

The politician's recent actions are an effort to forge a relationship with undecided voters.

verb
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To create a forgery of; to make a counterfeit item of; to copy or imitate unlawfully.

He had to forge his ex-wife's signature.

The jury learned the documents had been forged.

verb
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To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate.
verb
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(often as forge ahead) To move forward heavily and slowly (originally as a ship); to advance gradually but steadily; to proceed towards a goal in the face of resistance or difficulty.

The party of explorers forged through the thick underbrush.

We decided to forge ahead with our plans even though our biggest underwriter backed out.

verb
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(sometimes as forge ahead) To advance, move or act with an abrupt increase in speed or energy.

With seconds left in the race, the runner forged into first place.

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To forge is defined as to give form or shape to something.

An example of to forge is to build a settlement.

verb
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A furnace or hearth where metals are heated or wrought; a smithy.
noun
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A workshop where pig iron is transformed into wrought iron.
noun
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To fashion or reproduce for fraudulent purposes; counterfeit.

Forge a signature.

verb
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Origin of forge

  • Middle English from Old French from Vulgar Latin faurga from Latin fabrica from faber worker
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Probably from forge
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Make way, move ahead, most likely an alteration of force, but perhaps from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in referrence to vessels.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French forge, early Old French faverge, from Latin fabrica (“workshop”), from faber (“workman in hard materials, smith”) (genitive fabri).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Anglo-Norman forger, from Old French forgier, from Latin fabrico (“to frame, construct, build”).
    From Wiktionary