Oblate meaning

ŏblāt, ŏ-blāt
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Having the shape of a spheroid generated by rotating an ellipse about its shorter axis.
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Having an equatorial diameter greater than the distance between poles; compressed along or flattened at the poles.

Planet Earth is an oblate solid.

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A layperson dedicated to religious life, especially such a layperson who is affiliated with but not a member of a monastic order.
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(roman catholic church) A member of one of various religious communities whose members are bound by less stringent vows than those required of monastic orders.
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(geom.) Flattened at the poles.

An oblate spheroid.

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(r.c.ch.) A person dedicated to the religious life; esp., a person living in or associated with a religious community but not bound by vows.
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(Roman Catholic Church) A person dedicated to a life of religion or monasticism, especially a member of an order without religious vows or a lay member of a religious community.
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A child given up by its parents into the keeping or dedication of a religious order or house.
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The Earth is an oblate spheroid.

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Origin of oblate

  • Probably New Latin oblātus Latin ob- toward ob– Latin (prō)lātus prolate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Medieval Latin oblātus from Latin past participle of offerre to offer offer

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin oblātus (oblatus), from Latin ob (“in front of, before") + lātus (“broad, wide"), (modelled after prōlātus (“extended, lengthened")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From French oblat and its source, post-classical Latin oblatus "˜person dedicated to religious life', a noun use of the past participle of offerre "˜to offer'.

    From Wiktionary