Flesh meaning

flĕsh
Human nature, esp. in its sensual aspect.
noun
3
2
The flesh of any animal as food; meat; esp., meat other than fish or fowl.
noun
2
2
Flesh is defined as the soft tissue between the body's skin and bones, or the soft part of a fruit or vegetable that's usually able to be eaten.

An example of flesh is the fat and muscle just under your skin.

An example of flesh is the part of the strawberry that we eat.

noun
2
5
All living beings, esp. all humankind.
noun
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1
Kindred or relatives.
noun
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1
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To fill out as if with flesh; realize or make full, as by the addition of details.
verb
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1
To grow fleshy or fat.
verb
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1
To give substance or detail to; fill out. Often used with out:

Fleshed out the novel with a subplot.

verb
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2
To encourage (a falcon, for example) to participate in the chase by feeding it flesh from a kill.
verb
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2
The pulpy or edible part of fruits and vegetables.
noun
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2
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The human body, as distinguished from the soul.

More than flesh can bear.

noun
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2
The soft tissue of the body, especially muscle and fat.
noun
1
2
(botany) The pulpy, usually edible part of a fruit or vegetable.
noun
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0
The typical color of a white person's skin; ranging from beige or tan to yellowish pink.
noun
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1
(informal) Plumpness; fat.

You've been putting on flesh.

noun
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1
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To feed (animals) with flesh so as to incite them to hunt or kill.
verb
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1
To prepare for or incite to bloodshed, etc. by a foretaste.
verb
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1
To harden; inure.
verb
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1
To plunge (a weapon) into flesh.
verb
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1
To put flesh on; fatten.
verb
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1
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To remove flesh from (a hide)
verb
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1
The soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate, covering the bones and consisting mainly of skeletal muscle and fat.
noun
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1
The skin of a human or animal.
noun
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1
(by extension) Bare arms, bare legs, bare torso.
noun
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1
(archaic) Animal tissue regarded as food; meat.
noun
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1
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The human body as a physical entity.
noun
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1
(religion) The mortal body of a human being, contrasted with the spirit or soul.
noun
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1
(religion) The evil and corrupting principle working in man.
noun
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1
The soft, often edible, parts of fruits or vegetables.
noun
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1
A yellowish pink colour; the colour of some Caucasian human skin.

noun
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1
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To bury (something, especially a weapon) in flesh.
verb
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1
To put flesh on; to fatten.
verb
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1
To add details.

The writer had to go back and flesh out the climactic scene.

verb
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1
To remove the flesh from the skin during the making of leather.
verb
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1
Substance; reality.
noun
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2
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To clean (a hide) of adhering flesh.
verb
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2
To plunge or thrust (a weapon) into flesh.
verb
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2
(archaic) To inure (troops, for instance) to battle or bloodshed.
verb
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2
To become plump or fleshy; gain weight.
verb
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2
go the way of all flesh
  • To die.
  • To come to an end.
idiom
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in the flesh
  • Alive.
  • In person; present.
idiom
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in the flesh
  • alive
  • actually present; in person
idiom
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press the flesh
  • to shake hands or embrace, mingle, etc. effusively in crowds, esp. in politicking
idiom
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0

Origin of flesh

  • Middle English from Old English flǣsc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flesh, from Old English flǣsc, from Proto-Germanic *flaiską, from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁ḱ- (“to tear, peel off”). Compare German Fleisch, Low German Fleesch, West Frisian fleis, Dutch vlees, Danish flæsk, Icelandic flesk.

    From Wiktionary