Incarnate definition

ĭn-kärnĭt
To give actual form to; make real.
verb
7
3
Incarnate means to represent a spirit in human form, to be a perfect example of something, or to put an abstract concept into concrete form.

When a spirit represents himself in human form, this is an example of a time when a spirit incarnates himself.

When a person is a perfect example of greed, this is an example of a time when he incarnates greed.

verb
5
1
To provide with flesh or a body; embody.
verb
4
2
To be the type or embodiment of.

To incarnate the frontier spirit.

verb
3
2
Being a living example of; personified.

Evil incarnate.

adjective
2
1
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Endowed with a body, esp. a human body; in bodily form.
adjective
2
2
To embody in flesh, invest with a bodily, especially a human, form.
verb
2
2
Incarnate is defined as being in human form or the perfect example or embodiment of something.

A spirit who chooses to take the shape of a human form is an example of a spirit incarnate.

A person who is the perfect example of a unrestrained greed is an example of greed incarnate.

adjective
1
1
Embodied in flesh; given a bodily, especially a human, form; personified.
adjective
2
3
To make carnal, to reduce the spiritual nature of.
verb
1
2
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To put into or represent in a concrete form, as an idea.
verb
1
2
Not in the flesh; spiritual.
adjective
1
2
Incarnadine.
adjective
0
1
Invested with bodily nature and form.

An incarnate spirit.

adjective
0
1
Embodied in human form; personified.

A villain who is evil incarnate.

adjective
0
1
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To realize in action or fact; actualize.

A community that incarnates its founders' ideals.

verb
0
1
To give bodily, especially human, form to.
verb
0
1
To personify.
verb
0
1
Flesh-colored; pink.
adjective
0
1
Red; rosy.
adjective
0
1
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Origin of incarnate

  • Middle English from Late Latin incarnātus past participle of incarnāre to make flesh Latin in- causative pref. in–2 Latin carō carn- flesh sker-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ecclesiastical Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnari (“be made flesh”), from in- + caro (“flesh”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From the past participle stem of Latin incarnare (“make flesh”), from in- + caro (“flesh”).

    From Wiktionary

  • in- +‎ carnate

    From Wiktionary