Corporal definition

kôrpər-əl, kôrprəl
Of the body; bodily.
adjective
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Of or relating to the body.
adjective
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The lowest-ranking noncommissioned officer, just below a sergeant; specif., an enlisted person in the fourth grade in the U.S. Army and Marine Corps.
noun
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(eccles.) A small linen cloth put on the center of the altar, on which the bread and chalice are placed for the Eucharist.
noun
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The definition of corporal is something related to the body.

When you punish someone by harming his body and causing pain (such as by spanking the person) this is an example of corporal punishment.

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A corporal is defined as a low ranking non-commissioned officer in the military.

A man in the military who is below sergeant is an example of a corporal.

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One who holds the rank of corporal.
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A noncommissioned rank in the US Army that is above private first class and below sergeant.
noun
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A noncommissioned rank in the US Marine Corps that is above lance corporal and below sergeant.
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A white linen cloth on which the consecrated elements are placed during the celebration of the Eucharist.
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(now rare) Personal.
adjective
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adjective
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Of or relating to the body.
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(archaic) Having a physical, tangible body; corporeal.

Quotation.

adjective
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Of or pertaining to the body, especially the human body.
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(military) A non-commissioned officer army rank with NATO code OR-4. The rank below a sergeant but above a lance corporal and private.
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A non-commissioned officer rank in the police force, below a sergeant but above a private or patrolman.
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(ecclesiastical) The white linen cloth on which the elements of the eucharist are placed; a communion cloth.
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of corporal - corporale

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
corporal
Plural:
corporals

Origin of corporal

  • Middle English from Old French and from Medieval Latin corporāle both from Latin corporālis of the body (the Eucharistic bread being representative of Christ's body) from corpus corpor- body kwrep- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Obsolete French alteration of caporal from Old Italian caporale from capo head from Latin caput kaput- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin corporālis from corpus corpor- body kwrep- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the Latin corporale, the neuter of corporalis representing the doctrine of transubstantiation in which the eucharist becomes the body of Christ.

    From Wiktionary

  • Corrupted from the French caporal, from the Italian caporale, from capo (“head, leader”) from the Latin caput (“head”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French corporal (French corporel), from Latin corporālis, from Latin corpus (“body”); compare corporeal.

    From Wiktionary