Cleave meaning

klēv
To adhere, cling, or stick fast.
verb
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To be faithful.

Cleave to one's principles.

verb
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To cleave is to split or separate something, especially along a natural line of separation or using a sharp tool, or to stick or adhere strongly to something or someone.

When you split a bone in half using a knife, this is an example of cleave.

When candle wax causes a candle to become firmly stuck to a table, this is an example of a situation where the candle cleaves to the table.

When you become very attached to someone, this is an example of a situation where you cleave yourself to the person.

verb
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To split with a sharp instrument.
verb
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To make or accomplish by or as if by cutting.

Cleave a path through the ice.

verb
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To pierce or penetrate.

The wings cleaved the foggy air.

verb
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To split (a complex molecule) into simpler molecules.
verb
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To split or be capable or splitting, especially along a natural line of division.

Certain brittle woods cleave easily.

verb
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To penetrate or pass through something, such as water or air.
verb
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To divide by a blow, as with an ax; split.
verb
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To pierce.
verb
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To sever; disunite.
verb
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To split; separate; fall apart.
verb
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To make one's way by or as by cutting.
verb
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To adhere; cling (to)
verb
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To be faithful (to)
verb
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To split or sever something or as if with a sharp instrument.

The wings cleaved the foggy air.

verb
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(mineralogy) To break a single crystal (such as a gemstone or semiconductor wafer) along one of its more symmetrical crystallographic planes (often by impact), forming facets on the resulting pieces.
verb
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To make or accomplish by or as if by cutting.

The truck cleaved a path through the ice.

verb
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(chemistry) To split (a complex molecule) into simpler molecules.
verb
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(intransitive) To split.
verb
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(intransitive, mineralogy) Of a crystal, to split along a natural plane of division.
verb
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(technology) Flat, smooth surface produced by cleavage, or any similar surface produced by similar techniques, as in glass.
noun
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(intransitive) To cling, adhere or stick fast to something; used with to or unto.
verb
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Origin of cleave

  • Middle English cleven from Old English clēofan gleubh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English cleven from Old English cleofian
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English cleven, from the Old English strong verb clēofan, from Proto-Germanic *kleubaną, from Proto-Indo-European *glewbʰ- (“to cut, to slice”). Cognate with Dutch klieven, dialectal German klieben, Swedish klyva, and Greek γλύφω (glýfo, “carve”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old English cleofian, from Proto-Germanic *klibjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gley- (“to stick”). Cognates include German kleben, Dutch kleven.
    From Wiktionary