Hew meaning

hyo͝o
To make or shape with or as if with an ax.

Hew a path through the underbrush.

verb
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To cut down with an ax; fell.

Hew an oak.

verb
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To strike or cut; cleave.
verb
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To adhere or conform strictly; hold.

Hew to the line.

verb
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To cut something by repeated blows, as of an ax.
verb
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Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
abbreviation
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To chop or cut with an ax, knife, etc.; hack; gash.
verb
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To make or shape by or as by cutting or chopping with an ax, etc.
verb
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To chop (a tree) with an ax so as to cause it to fall.
verb
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To make cutting or chopping blows with an ax, knife, etc.
verb
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To conform or adhere (to a line, rule, principle, etc.)
verb
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(Department of) Health, Education, and Welfare (1953-79)
abbreviation
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To chop away at; to whittle down; to mow down.
verb
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To shape; to form.

One of the most widely used typefaces in the world was hewn by the English printer and typographer John Baskerville.

To hew out a sepulchre.

verb
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(US) To act according to, to conform to; usually construed with to.
verb
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Destruction by cutting down.
noun
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A patronymic surname​.
pronoun
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The definition of hew is to chop, cut or shape something with an ax, or to conform or adhere.

When a tree falls down on your property and you cut and shape it until it becomes a little bench to sit on, this is an example of a time when you hew.

When a romance writer sticks rigidly to the formula of boy-meets-girl, then gets-girl, then loses girl, this is an example of a time when the author hews to traditional literary ideals.

verb
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Origin of hew

  • Middle English hewen from Old English hēawan kau- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hewen, from Old English hēawan, from Proto-Germanic *hawwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂u- (“to strike, hew, forge”). Cognate with Scots hew, hewe, West Frisian houwe, Dutch houwen, German hauen, Swedish hugga, Icelandic höggva; and with Latin cūdō (“strike, beat, pound, forge”), Lithuanian káuti (“to beat, forge”), Albanian hu (“a club, pole”). See also hoe.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Hugh.

    From Wiktionary