Axe meaning

ăks
Frequency:
(An X Editor) A text editor used with the X Window system. By adding widgets, aXe can be customized by the user.
2
0
(informal) A dismissal or rejection.

His girlfriend/boss/schoolmaster gave him the axe.

noun
1
0
A tool for felling trees or chopping wood etc. consisting of a heavy head flattened to a blade on one side, and a handle attached to it.
noun
0
0
(slang, music) A gigging musician's particular instrument, especially a guitar in rock music or a saxophone in jazz.
noun
0
0
(finance) A directional position or interest, by a dealer in a financial market - if one wishes to unload stock, one is “axed to sell" or “has an axe". Derived from “have an axe to grind", which is also used.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To fell or chop with an axe.
verb
0
0
To terminate or reduce tremendously in a rough or ruthless manner.

The government announced its plans to axe public spending.

The broadcaster axed the series because far less people than expected watched it.

verb
0
0
To lay off: to terminate a person's employment.

He got axed in the last round of firings.

verb
0
0
(archaic) The axle of a wheel.
noun
0
0
To furnish with an axle.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke IIi.

And the people axed hym, sayinge: What shall we do then.

verb
0
0
An ancient weapon consisting of a head that has one or two blades and a long handle.
noun
0
1

Origin of axe

  • From Middle English, from Old English æx, from Proto-Germanic *akwisÄ«, probably from a Proto-Indo-European *hâ‚‚egÊ·s-ihâ‚‚- (“axe"), from *hâ‚‚eḱ- (“sharp, pointed"). Compare German Axt, Danish økse, Icelandic öxi, and also Latin acsia.

    From Wiktionary