Stroke Definition

strōk
stroked, strokes, stroking
noun
strokes
A striking of one thing against another; blow or impact of an ax, whip, etc.
Webster's New World
The sound so produced.
American Heritage
A sudden action resulting in a powerful or destructive effect, as if from a blow.
A stroke of lightning.
Webster's New World
The time so indicated.
At the stroke of midnight.
American Heritage
A sudden occurrence, often a pleasant one.
A stroke of luck.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
failureloss
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verb
stroked, strokes, stroking
To rub lightly with or as if with the hand or something held in the hand; caress.
American Heritage
To draw one's hand, a tool, etc. gently over the surface of, as in caressing or smoothing.
Webster's New World
To mark with strokes or draw a line through.
Webster's New World
To draw a line through; cancel.
Stroked out the last sentence.
American Heritage
To behave attentively or flatteringly toward (someone), especially in order to restore confidence or gain cooperation.
American Heritage
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adjective
Of or for masturbating.
A stroke magazine.
Webster's New World
idiom
keep stroke
  • to make strokes in rhythm
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Stroke

Noun

Singular:
stroke
Plural:
strokes

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Stroke

  • keep stroke

Origin of Stroke

  • From Middle English *stroak, strok, strak, from Old English *strāc (“stroke"), from Proto-Germanic *straikaz (“stroke"), from Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (“stroke; to strike"). Cognate with Scots strak, strake, straik (“stroke, blow"), Middle Low German strÄ“k (“stroke, trick, prank"), German Streich (“stroke").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English stroken, straken, from Old English strācian (“to stroke"), from Proto-Germanic *straikōnÄ… (“to stroke, caress"). Cognate with German streicheln (“to stroke, fondle").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English stroken from Old English strācian from strāc stroke stroke1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English probably from Old English strāc streig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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