Stride meaning

strīd
To walk with long steps, especially in a hasty or vigorous way.
verb
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A step of progress; an advance.

Making great strides in their studies.

noun
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To stride is to walk along, especially with large steps.

An example of stride is when you walk down the street purposefully, wanting to quickly get to your destination.

verb
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To take a single long step, as in passing over an obstruction.
verb
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To stand or sit astride; straddle.
verb
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To walk with long steps on, along, or over.

Striding the stage.

verb
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To step over or across.

Stride a brook.

verb
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To be astride of; straddle.
verb
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The act of striding.
noun
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To walk with long steps, esp. in a vigorous or swaggering manner.
verb
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To take a single, long step (esp. over something)
verb
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To take a single, long step in passing over (an obstacle, etc.)
verb
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To walk with long steps along or through.

To stride the street.

verb
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To sit or stand astride of; straddle.
verb
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The act of striding.
noun
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A manner of running; gait.
noun
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Progress; advancement.

To make rapid strides.

noun
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Designating or of a style of piano playing in which the left hand alternates rhythmically between a strong bass note and middle-range chords.
adjective
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(Spoofing, Tampering, Repudiation, Information, Denial, Elevation) An acronym for remembering six areas of risk in technology. For an excellent example of applying STRIDE to Web applications, visit the keepers of the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) at www.owasp.com.Spoofing IdentitiesA user should not be able to assume the identity of, or mask the attributes of, someone else. Using a public key infrastructure (PKI) and digital signatures is a way of preventing spoofing.Tampering With DataThe integrity of data should be preserved at all times. Encryption, independent verification and input, process and output validation are some of the tools that can be used.Repudiate a TransactionA valid transaction should not be subject to rejection. Good audit trails and signing a message with date and time are examples of preventative methods.Information DisclosureInformation should not fall into unauthorized hands. Data loss prevention (DLP) techniques are used to strengthen corporate confidentiality. See DLP.Denial of ServiceA server or an application should not be vulnerable to being put out of service. Redundant and/or backup systems are datacenter architectures that can be used.Elevation of PrivilegeAn unauthorized user should not be allowed administrator rights. Refusing to share passwords or tokens can reduce this risk. See access control.
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(intransitive) To walk with long steps.
verb
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To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.
verb
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To pass over at a step; to step over.
verb
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verb
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noun
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(computing) The number of memory locations between successive elements in an array, pixels in a bitmap, etc.
noun
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hit (one's) stride
  • To achieve a steady, effective pace.
  • To attain a maximum level of competence.
idiom
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take in stride
  • To cope with calmly, without interrupting one's normal routine:.
    Taking their newfound wealth in stride.
idiom
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hit one's stride
  • To reach one's normal speed or level of efficiency.
idiom
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take in (one's) stride
  • To cope with (a difficult task or challenge) without hesitation, disruption, overreaction, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take in stride
take in (one's) stride

Origin of stride

  • Middle English striden from Old English strīdan
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English stridan (“to stride"), from Proto-Germanic *strÄ«danÄ…. Cognate with Low German striden (“fight"), Dutch strijden (“fight"), German streiten (“fight, quarrel").
    From Wiktionary
  • See the above verb.
    From Wiktionary