Gallop definitions

găl'əp
A ride taken at a gallop.
noun
63
1
A rapid pace.

Events were proceeding at a gallop.

noun
60
1
A disordered rhythm of the heart characterized by three or four distinct heart sounds in each cycle and resembling the sound of a galloping horse.
noun
57
1
The fastest gait of a horse or other animal, consisting of a succession of leaping strides with all the feet off the ground at one time.
noun
57
1
To cause to gallop.
verb
54
1
A ride on a galloping animal.
noun
54
1
To go or move at a gallop.
verb
51
0
Any fast pace, speedy action, or rapid progression.
noun
51
1
To move or progress swiftly.

Summer was galloping by.

verb
48
0
To go at a gallop.
verb
48
0
To move, progress, or act very fast; hurry.
verb
45
1
To cause to gallop.
verb
42
0
The definition of a gallop is the fast speed at which a horse moves when all four feet are off the ground, or any fast pace.

An example of a gallop is a horse's speed around a racetrack.

An example of a gallop is a quick series of decisions: moved along at a gallop.

noun
15
0
Gallop is defined as to hurry or move quickly.

An example of gallop is for a horse to race quickly up a hill.

verb
12
0
A disordered rhythm of the heart characterized by three or four distinct heart sounds in each cycle and resembling the sound of a galloping horse.
noun
5
0
The fastest gait of a horse.
noun
4
0
To ride at a galloping pace.
verb
4
0
A two-beat stride during which all four legs are off the ground simultaneously.
noun
1
0
To cause to gallop.

To gallop a horse.

verb
1
0
A gait of a horse, faster than a canter, in which all four feet are off the ground at the same time during each stride.
noun
0
0
A fast running motion of other quadrupeds.
noun
0
0
To make electrical or other utility lines sway and/or move up and down violently, usually due to a combination of high winds and ice accrual on the lines.
verb
0
0
To run very fast.
verb
0
0
(figuratively) To go rapidly or carelessly, as in making a hasty examination.
verb
0
0

Origin of gallop

From Middle English galopen (“to gallop”), from Old French galoper (compare modern French galoper), from Frankish *wala hlaupan (“to run well”) from *wala (“well”) + *hlaupan (“to run”), from Proto-Germanic *hlaupaną (“to run, leap, spring”), from Proto-Indo-European *klaup-, *klaub- (“to spring, stumble”). Possibly also derived from a deverbal of Frankish *walhlaup (“battle run”) from *wal (“battlefield”) from a Proto-Germanic word meaning "dead, victim, slain" from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (“death in battle, killed in battle”) + *hlaup (“course, track”) from *hlaupan (“to run”). More at well, leap, valkyrie. See also the doublet wallop, coming from the same source through an Old Northern French variant.