Jog meaning

jŏg
To move by shoving, bumping, or jerking; jar.

A rough wagon ride that jogged the passengers.

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To give a push or shake to; nudge.

Jogged her dozing companion with her elbow.

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To cause to jog.
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To rouse or stimulate as if by nudging.

An old photo that might jog your memory.

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To cause (a horse) to move at a leisurely pace.
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A slight push or shake; a nudge.
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A jogging movement or rhythm.
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A slow steady trot.
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A protruding or receding part in a surface or line.
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An abrupt change in direction.

A jog in the road.

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To turn sharply; veer.

Here the boundary jogs south.

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To stir or revive (a person's memory)
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To move along at a slow, steady, jolting pace or trot; specif., to engage in jogging as a form of exercise.
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To go (on or along) in a steady, slow, heavy manner.
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A little shake, shove, or nudge.
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A slow, steady, jolting motion or trot.
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An act or instance of jogging.
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A projecting or notched part, esp. one at right angles, in a surface or line.
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A sharp, temporary change of direction, as in a road or one's course.
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To form or make a jog.

Turn left where the road jogs.

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A form of exercise, slower than a run; an energetic trot.
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To push slightly; to move or shake with a push or jerk, as to gain the attention of; to jolt.

Jog one's elbow.

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To shake, stir or rouse.

I tried desperately to jog my memory.

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(exercise (sport)) To move in an energetic trot.
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To cause to move at an energetic trot.

To jog a horse.

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To straighten stacks of paper by lightly tapping against a flat surface.
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To move with a jolting rhythm.

The pack jogged against his back as he ran.

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Origin of jog

  • Perhaps alteration of Middle English shoggen to shake, move with a jerk perhaps alteration of shokken to move rapidly from Middle Low German schocken to shake

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Variant of jag

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From earlier shog (“to jolt, shake”), from Middle English shoggen, schoggen (“to shake up and down, jog”), from Middle Dutch schocken (“to jolt, bounce”) or Middle Low German schoggen, schucken (“to shog”), from Old Saxon *skokkan (“to move”), from Proto-Germanic *skukkaną (“to move, shake, tremble”). More at shock.

    From Wiktionary