Trot meaning

trŏt
Trot is defined as to ride or move as a horse does when its front leg and opposite hind leg are up at the same time.

An example of trot is to move along quickly.

verb
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The definition of a trot is a quick, jogging motion.

An example of a trot is a motion that is faster than a walk and slower than a run.

noun
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A gait of a person, faster than a walk; a jog.
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(sports) A race for trotters.
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(informal) Diarrhea. Used with the.
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A toddler.
noun
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To go or move at a trot.
verb
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(archaic) An old woman.
noun
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To proceed rapidly; hurry.
verb
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To cause to move at a trot.
verb
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To move, ride, drive, run, or go at a trot.
verb
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To move quickly; hurry; run.
verb
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To cause to go at a trot.
verb
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A gait, as of a horse, in which a front leg and the opposite hind leg are lifted at the same time.
noun
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A jogging gait of a person, between a walk and a run.
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The sound of a trotting horse.
noun
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A horse race for trotters.
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(archaic) An old woman.
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(archaic, disparaging) An ugly old woman, a hag. [From 1362.]
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(chiefly of horses) A gait of a four-legged animal between walk and canter, a diagonal gait (in which diagonally opposite pairs of legs move together).
noun
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A gait of a person faster than a walk.
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A toddler. [From 1854.]
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(dance) A moderately rapid dance.
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(mildly disparaging) Short for Trotskyist.
noun
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(Australia, New Zealand, with "good" or "bad") A run of luck or fortune.

He"²s had a good trot, but his luck will end soon.

noun
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To walk rapidly.
verb
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(intransitive, of a horse) To move at a gait between a walk and a canter.
verb
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To cause to move, as a horse or other animal, in the pace called a trot; to cause to run without galloping or cantering.
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hot to trot
  • eager for a sexual encounter; yearning for sex
idiom
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the trots
  • a case of diarrhea
idiom
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(informal) trot out
  • to bring out for others to see or admire
  • to submit for approval
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of trot

  • Middle English from Old French from troter to trot of Germanic origin N., sense 7, origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English trotten, from Old French trotter, troter (“to go, trot"), from Medieval Latin *trottāre, *trotāre (“to go"), from Frankish *trottōn (“to go, run"), from Proto-Germanic *trudōnÄ…, *trudanÄ…, *tradjanÄ… (“to go, step, tread"), from Proto-Indo-European *dreu-, *derÉ™-, *drā- (“to run, escape"). Cognate with Old High German trottōn (“to run"), Modern German trotten (“to trot, plod"), Gothic 𐍄𐍂𐌿𐌳𐌰𐌽 (trudan, “to tread"), Old Norse troða (“to walk, tread"), Old English tredan (“to step, tread"). More at tread.

    From Wiktionary